The Stickler Weekly 193 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



5-across


12-across

13-across

15-across

18-across

26-across

28-across

1-down

3-down

6-down

7-down

8-down


14-down

16-down




The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
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27 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 193 Clue Hints

  1. Norman Remedios says:

    4D is my pick

  2. Richard Sternes says:

    Thoughts on 10a & 19d Anyone?
    After most of the day spent unscrambling the 12a Egg, still have no idea – Why So!!!

    • Norman Remedios says:

      10a is a double definition I think as is 19d. For digital, finger applies

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Of course Norman. Did get t0 10a (light-bulb moment)
        ……………Say “Digital” these days
        & first thoughts are of entirely different matters.

  3. Wendy Simpson says:

    More teaching this week, so haven’t even starrted!

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    Yup! There’s 10a – too easy. 19d seems self-evident – But???
    Other favourites 12a (but what a Journey & still – Why So?),13a, 22a (had no idea)
    4d (agree Norman – brilliant), 14d & 17d (for conciseness)
    & 20d – well we have one of those – here – each week…!!!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      A good selection of challenges.
      My take on 12a goes like this. Split the second last word into 4 letters and the
      balance. If you are delivering the second part, you will need a guide as to when to do the first part, otherwise you will run out of breath. That works for me.
      I have more than one 20d each week, as I swear to give up only to come back with a revelation.
      Incidentally Richard, make sure you go out to Highfields to see the winning garden in Smythe Street. The Ward garden at Highfields is well worth a visit too. It was really quirky last year.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Would NEVER have got to 12a without the above Arthur. Brilliant.
        Just could not see the connection.
        Warning in David’s Clue Hints was “tricky” – to put it mildly!!!!!
        …..Limited mobility, but Thanks for the tip.
        Only what must be done – gets done.

      • Greg Mansell says:

        My take on 12a is a bit more straightforward: Words 4 & 5 tell you what to do with words 1, 2 & 3. The remainder of the clue is the definition. This is my pick of the week.

      • Greg Mansell says:

        Also, a significant part of this clue is that it contains a space where you normally wouldn’t expect to find one.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          It was the definition that confounded me Greg.
          Would never have ‘got it’ without Arthur’s by-the-letters explanation.
          I was all hammers & nails……..

          • Greg Mansell says:

            Arthur’s explanation is an interesting sideline – but I think you will find that David’s intention is that the definition is word 6 onwards.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            So Greg –
            your take is “restoration” as the anagram clue.
            Now I am even more seriously impressed by this
            & I get your “space” reference too now.
            Sheer Brilliance
            – definitely Hall of Fame Material

  5. Steve C says:

    Certainly back with a vengeance this week David, needed a dictionary for 22a. Favourites are 4d, 8d, 20d and 22a – a great clue!

  6. Arthur Maynard says:

    So many to choose from.
    18a. I ferried my sons to sailing training and competition for many years, but had not heard of this particular sheet. I thought it was a rather warm piece of underwear.
    2a One of the best this week. It amuses each time I think of it.
    13a gave me most heartache, but it is a real gem. I have to chuckle when I think how easily I was led astray.
    15a A new word for me with the “o”. I had much experience with the shorter version.
    22a took me one step back from the next to last. Another new word.
    These are my selections from a great set of clues with lots of variety.
    I hope you have a speedy recovery from the dreaded lurgy. I was sorry to hear you were so generous in sharing.

  7. Arthur Maynard says:

    I have just checked out David’s hints. The puzzle would have been a lot easier if I had done that when I was having trouble.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Liked all your Picks of The Week Arthur – cross-over with a few of mine.
      I think like me you have forgone Weekly Gold Medal.
      ALL would not fit on the Podium.
      Really like how this Forum has grown.
      These days I’m never left with an unresolved issue e.g. 12a & 19d (Norman above).

      & lets ALL be mindful “The Cheque is in The Mail, David – today”

  8. Wendy Simpson says:

    Yes, difficult choice for Gold Medal, but I think 4d.

  9. Richard Sternes says:

    Could get with you on 4d Wendy
    but on further reflection – 12a – has to be very strong candidate for Hall Of Fame…….
    (Break from Teaching by looks of it…..!!!)

  10. Arthur Maynard says:

    Like Richard I find there are too many contenders for the podium. Eureka moments, wide smiles, education. What more would you want. But I will force myself to make a choice and go for 12a.

  11. Christine Hulley says:

    That was a difficult one! 4d was standout for me.

  12. Greg Mansell says:

    Very entertaining overall, but, as usual, there were a few standouts: 12ac, 25ac, 2dn, 4dn, 7dn & 19dn. Also, I just noticed the solutions of 4dn vs 17dn. Deliberate? Or a happy accident?

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I did note the relationship, but identified the usage of different words for very similar definitions. In one of my work places we were instructed to 17d issues and problems, but we would never 4d them.

      For 19d I had to work around the idea that when I attached something it was firmly fixed, whereas this attachment is easily removed.

  13. Greg C says:

    Yes I’d never heard of the sail or the mushroom, so had to reverse engineer those after guessing the answers.