The Stickler Weekly 164 Solution

I’m going to try and clear up a couple of things this week. There were some other things, and I’ll happily talk about those as part of this solution post. Just add a reply below.
First, CUT = BURN from Stickler Weekly 163. I have to admit I found only a few references where the two terms, essentially meaning to create a disk containing music or data, are treated as equal. None of major dictionary references specifically equated the two, however there was this entry in the  Chambers Thesaurus (which I think was the one I relied on):
cut v, n
verb

9 cut a recording
record, make, tape, tape-record, videotape, burn

(In case you were wondering, the colours used match those in my Chambers Thesaurus software through WordWeb)

Upon further review it seems that this is one of those occasions where one term may be used to replace the other in almost all cases, that is, it is probably ok to say “cut” where “burn” is used (in context) but not the other way round.
In highsight, I don’t believe they have absolute equation and therefore the original clue is faulty.
The second thing I want to clear up is equation of “recognised” (note, not “(something that) is recognised”) and “standard” in the answer to 1 across in this crossword. One of the many tricks crossword setters employ is the use of “word form shift”, that is a word appears to have one word form in the clue (the clue is constructed in sentence form with normal nouns, adjectives etc) but in reality a different word form is used when finding the answer. A word that appears to be a noun actually must be viewed as an adjective, and one that appears to be a verb is actually a noun, and so on. This trickery is all fine as long as the word in the clue doesn’t have words around it that make it a particular class of word. For example, if a clue contained “to run”, and “to” had no role in the clue, then “run” has to be a verb. In the clue in question, “is” is an linking word, and although “recognised” looks to be verbal in nature, it’s actually being used as an adjective, and translates to the adjective “standard”. Thus: “Stickler’s cryptic clueing always uses recognised/standard devices”.
Now, something very important: if the equation doesn’t seem right by applying what appears to be a particular nature of a word, then you are probably missing something and there’s a need to dig a little deeper. Not always that easy, like in this case, as “recognised” doesn’t stand out obviously as an adjective, but worth exploring to feel comfortable with the parsing of a clue. Be assured that with any Stickler cryptic clue, there will ALWAYS be a direct relationship between clue part and answer, and at no time will I require solvers to make assumptions or insert missing components to make things work. It’s simple, if it doesn’t quite work you’ve missed something or I’ve made a flat-out mistake. I can’t say this is the case for all setters, but in general I would call it a rule.

Across Answers and Clues Explanations
1 STAND GUARD
Act as sentry is recognised clutching sawn-off gun? (5,5) (GU)N inside STANDARD
6 BUFF
Smooth person who’s considered an expert (4) Double Definition
9 RUINS
Archaeological site manages with one stationed internally (5) I inside RUNS
10 RASPBERRY
File by accepting goof’s rude outburst (9) (RASP + BY) outside ERR
12 ARSONIST
Criminal family member is involved in “creative” work (8) (SON + IS) inside ART
13 PLAITS
Soft, intertwined tails? (6) P + anagram of TAILS
15 SCENE
Part of a play viewed by audience (5) Sounds like SEEN
16 REPAIRED
Agent before broadcast is put right (8) REP + AIRED
18 EMERGENT
Distributed agreement, with a section missing, is calling for immediate action (8) Anagram of AGREEMENT minus A
20 ROBIN
Club’s last member, in possession of iron, contrived a birdie (5) CLU(B) inside anagram of IRON
23 INGOTS
Blocks shaped in stone turned up east of pass (6) IN + (ST reversed after GO)
24 CAST DOWN
Leader of conservatives wasn’t upset about party crushed (4,4) (C)ONSERVATIVES + (anagram of WASNT outside DO)
26 BOARDROOM
Cleaner carrying a rod transformed high-level meeting area (9) BROOM outside anagram of A ROD
27 BUSTS
Sculptured artwork of important people breaks (5) Double Definition
28 RHEA
Bird that’s flightless and tailless, heard in various places (4) Anagram of (HEAR)D
29 HATCHET MAN
The match arranged by an enforcer (7,3) Anagram of THE MATCH + AN
 Down  Answers and Clues Explanations
1 SARGASSO
So a grass at sea is…? (8) Anagram of SO A GRASS
2 AT ISSUE
A paper under consideration (2,5) A + TISSUE
3 DISINTEGRATED
Inert gas, affected by temperature inside, dwindled and decayed (13) (Anagram of INERT GAS + T) inside DIED
4 UNRESERVED
Open a French wine holding function (10) UN + (RED outside SERVE)
5 RISK
Chance is taken within the confines of racetrack? (4) IS inside (R)ACETRAC(K)
7 UKRAINE
Wet weather in country bordered by East European republic (7) RAIN inside (UK + E)
8 FLY ASH
Yttrium detected in expensive power station’s discharge (3,3) Y inside FLASH
11 BILLIARD TABLE
Expert, starting with a drill bit, fixed pool equipment (8,5) ABLE after anagram of A DRILL BIT
14 OPHTHALMIC
Operation conducted by hospital reduced the false claim relating to the eye (10) OP + H + (TH)E + anagram of CLAIM
17 IN UNISON
Together one sister and I sat with child (2,6) I + NUN + I + SON
19 MAGNATE
Powerbroker may cut off corrupt agent (7) (MA)Y + anagram of AGENT
21 BLOSSOM
Mature group of people upset about money not recovered (7) MOB reversed outside LOSS
22 LIMBER
Flexible military transporter (6) Double Definition
25 SODA
Turf laid next to a compound (4) SOD + A

 

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2 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 164 Solution

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    Thank you for the blog, and the clarification. I had no issues with standard. When I worked for the bank, there were recognised procedures for handling customer complaints. Every manager was expected to follow those guidelines. Thus they were standard.
    As for cut/burn, I blew hot and cold on it. I even found a reference to a burn cut in mining which enhances drilling and blasting efficiency and economy which supported your usage from an entirely different source.
    I was really intrigued by limber as I had not encountered it in the context of military transport. It was interesting to see the manner in which the posters attempted to convey their thoughts without confirming the word.
    This is the earliest I have had the puzzle thanks to your DST, but I will not spoil my good night’s sleep by putting pen to paper just yet.
    Again thank you for the challenge, the extension of vocabulary, and the ready explanation.
    Arthur

  2. Steve Ball says:

    The explanations for 13-ac and 1-dn might have pointed out that they’re also &lit. You’re obviously too modest. 😉

    In 23-ac. the “up” seems to me to require a down clue. Am I missing something?

    I loved the the total misdirection of everything in 23-ac, especially the cute definition.

    And now to this week’s …

    Thanks,
    Steve = : ^ )