The Stickler Weekly 166 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

4-across




13-across

16-across

21-across


27-across


29-across

1-down





10-down

14-down


17-down

18-down

20-down


A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
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9 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 166 Clue Hints

  1. richard sternes says:

    OK – so what’s with the Charade Clues?
    22a have an answer but ‘found in park with visitor’ seems nothing to do with it.
    29a totally bereft of ideas
    23d ditto
    not sure about 7d either have an answer but ‘fine wool for knitting’ has me baffled.

  2. richard sternes says:

    Delete 7d. Yet another alternative use of which I was totally unaware.
    Not much of a knitter either!!!

  3. richard sternes says:

    Figured it must be my turn to break cover – Arthur.

  4. Christine Hulley says:

    Good one this week, kept me guessing for quite a while!

  5. Arthur Maynard says:

    A bad week for me. Too many things on the boil.
    I have had to rely on David’s hints this week, which is somewhat disappointing.
    First my likes.
    25a 27a 18d and 20d. With the hints, they fell into place. They appealed to my sense of humour.
    Checked with Mr Google to confirm my 7d. I worked in wool country a few times, but never encountered this term. There at no knitters in the family so no help there.
    David’s hint provides a good start for 29a. The rest is a fairly modern term, but the whole describes my grandchildren when we are around.
    Good one for 22a. The start of 23d will help. (23d was third last in). Richard your phrase is incorrect. Add and subtract for the definition. I followed your lead with the park, but eventually got back on track.
    Big struggle with 14d, but finally the penny dropped with the help of crosses, and got 19a from the letters, before working back to confirm the definition.
    I had to change 1a (which parsed and had one obscure reference in google) which then gave 2d after changing my ideas on the definition.
    I was really not with it this week. Better luck next week.
    9a is a classic
    Some more of your cryptic humour David! Keep the challenges coming.

    Back to the grindstone

  6. richard sternes says:

    Oh Boy! What a saga. Thanks Arthur.
    22a has nothing to do with a stable worker &/or certain type of modern musician.
    Not one of my better weeks but finally – All is revealed.

  7. richard sternes says:

    & very glad to hear that the Grandies are sometime 29a – Arthur

  8. Greg C says:

    Yep I alo used more clue hints than I’d like to admit, and had to google the knitting term

  9. Arthur Maynard says:

    Richard I also persisted with social workers in 22a to no avail.
    See you all on Wednesday when we can lick our wounds.

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