The Stickler Weekly 168 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.





11-across

14-across

15-across


20-across

24-across



28-across

29-across


1-down

3-down

4-down




13-down

16-down

17-down

19-down

21-down




The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or series of words that signify the removal of a letter, letters, word or words (or their equivalents) from other parts of the clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: taken from, decreased by, less.

The entire answer can be discovered by mixing up letters. An appropriate anagram indicator will be present.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
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5 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 168 Clue Hints

  1. richard sternes says:

    Work in Progress David
    18a must have looked very fetching AND quite interesting.
    Are there pictures???

  2. Arthur Maynard says:

    I had a clear day today and managed the grid with a number of sittings.
    False starts on 1d, 8d, and 10a which meant bringing out the whiteout.
    Gold stars to 9a, 10a, 15a (so many options to explore) 28a and 29a
    17d is a pearler. I kept trying to work Stickler into it. Eventually googled my answer to confirm the definition.
    13d had nothing to do with my previous occupation which was hard to discard.
    A really challenging puzzle, with a variety of hard and simple clues. Reading the blog enlightened me as to why I sometimes think David has gone easily on us, only to come up against a brick wall.
    The interesting thing is that what is difficult for some is fairly easy for others, and David manages to strike a balance to keep us coming back for more.
    Like you Richard, I would like to have seen a photo of 18a. Much more exciting than wearing flannelette pyjamas

  3. richard sternes says:

    We’ve been down the same road yet again Arthur. Agree with All of the Above
    especially 17d. Was right onto the ending, but took quite a bit to get the start
    & there it was all the time. Was quick overall (before days end) but NOT easy.
    I don’t bother with any other puzzles.
    Like to think I’m mostly on David’s wave-length & quite like that.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Being at a loose end once the puzzle was unpuzzled, I decided to follow your lead to puzzle 23.
      I assumed you used puzzle 23, not boxed set 23 which is a different kettle of fish.
      I found the development in complexity of clues between 23 and 168 interesting. Always the wry sense of humour. Cat for vessel, pot for corporation, the old chestnut, and the phone book. I was taken aback by the word for voraciously consume. and had to google the hard wood to check I had the correct term and spelling.

  4. richard sternes says:

    There we go Arthur same page yet again.
    Agree with the subtle development in complexity.
    Wonder if it is intentional or in fact, developmental – David?
    & Yes. Have always loved the wry sense of humour.
    Still find myself following similar false paths three years on tho.
    Oh! Well! What is life without a few challenges (& unwinding a few self-created ones).