The Stickler Weekly 173 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



10-across

11-across

12-across

15-across

18-across

22-across

23-across




29-across

2-down

3-down

5-down

7-down

9-down


16-down


21-down



The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

The entire answer can be discovered by mixing up letters. An appropriate anagram indicator will be present.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or phrase that defines the answer. All cryptic clues usually have a minimum of one definition which will be located at the beginning or end of the clue.
The answer is a jumbling of letters except for the initial or final letter of the anagram fodder. An anagram indicator and truncation indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The entire answer is found by reversing part of the clue, or a synonym for part of the clue. A suitable reversal indicator will be present.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
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15 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 173 Clue Hints

  1. Richard Sternes says:

    Maybe you have eased up David, maybe you have not.
    I’m sure the answers to 15a & 18a whenever they come to me,
    will be totally unknown & quite spectacular.

  2. Richard Sternes says:

    SO – there’s 15a, but at this stage, inexplicably.

  3. Arthur Maynard says:

    Richard
    Lots of 4 letter words for you this week – including some coupled with another longer word.

    I am totally flummoxed with 18a, and 9d. I have a dish for 15a, even found a recipe. As to how it fits the clue – it’s a puzzlement.

    16d should be a cinch for Richard and me, but I am bereft of ideas at present.
    David have you exchanged the dictionary for cook books?

    I thought 13a was very droll. and 29a is a good challenge . Struggling with the parsing of 22a. I have a verb with a vowel at the end, I cannot account for.

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    15a a little oblique Arthur, it’s all about a variant of “definitely” & the gut of “one”.
    Like you – completely, totally baffled by 18a. Was hoping you could assist………!!!
    Have every second letter, but don’t want to resort to Solver so early. Expecting a WOW.

    Needed some help with 9d – variant of “important” & metal is a “can”
    16d not really about you & I, it’s an unusual take on a day-to-day “schedule”.
    Tourer runs on “erasers”

    Eureka Week! No pesky four letter words. YAY!
    Yes to 13a & 29a. …22a – Dog it surely is plus an alternative to “one”

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Richard
      15a I checked out David’s clue hint and found how far out I was. Now I have it. A massive anagram.
      22a I was using the verb when I should have used the noun. Thanks for the tip.
      David’s hint for 16d helps to get the correct answer.
      9d also works for me now.
      That only leaves 18 a. I think I can see a farm which makes me think of seafood.
      Yes I was right. it is seafood, but very very obscure. Break the clue into 3 parts. You will need google to confirm. I cannot see how I can work this into dinner conversation even with epicures.

      David this has to be one of your best challenges.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        Richard 18a will give you practice with your favourite type of clue.

        It is a four letter word then drow rettel ruof a which is followed by what you only bet when you are on a sure thing.

        You can send me a scotch via the internet for that!

  5. Wendy Simpson says:

    Liked 22a, still working on the rest-four day break will give me a chance to catch up with you guys.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      You saw the trouble I had with 22a.

      There are a couple of googlies in this puzzle. A great mixture of easy, reasonable, and challenging.

  6. Richard Sternes says:

    Thanks Arthur.
    OH Boy!!! Would not have cleared that 18a hurdle without assistance.
    Ultimate in new words & I don’t even like oysters………

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      the best thing about oysters is you can eat them again and again

      Next best is that you have permission to Kill Patrick

  7. Christine Hulley says:

    I had never heard of 18a before. Good one for scabble.

  8. Maggie says:

    I enjoyed this puzzle and just as interesting is the blog. Having a biology background 18 Across was straight forward and easily explained. Arthur’s hints earlier leave me totally puzzled.

    The only one that I could not explain was 3 down. Looked at the hints and got it straight away – an Australian idiom I know but do not use, therefore did not think of.

    A lot of clues I enjoyed.

    • Arfthur Maynard says:

      The biology would have helped plenty with 18a. It is a word I had never heard of, and I had to build it from the known crosses.

      I think this is what puzzled you. I was suggesting a four letter word then a four letter word reversed. followed by a high stakes bet.

      The scotch reference was me sending my account.

      It appealed to my sense of humour at the time.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Mine too…….
        Still have not worked out how to achieve this – Arthur.
        Spillage risk etc. On FB could have sent you a picture………

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      18a I avoided biology in my school days, so missed the opportunity to get introduced to molluscs. I had to work it out using the crosses.

      I suggested a four letter word, then another reversed, followed by a high stakes bet.

      The scotch reference was me sending my account.

      Hard to pick the bests clue, but the ones which caused most comment were 15 and 18a