The Stickler Weekly 174 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



11-across


13-across

16-across


23-across


26-across


29-across


3-down



14-down


18-down

19-down


22-down


The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The answer is found by using the sound of a word or phrase. Sounds-like indicators point the way.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
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17 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 174 Clue Hints

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    David, some will say you eased up this week. 18d is my pick. I got some practice at U3A before coming home to the final clue.

    Funny how clues which are hard for one, are simple for others.

  2. Richard Sternes says:

    Still very much, Work-in-Progress for me – maybe 50% – & not going well.
    Have to say though 13a – ‘solitary’ as a noun is quite something.

    Will be back when I really hit the wall………
    OH! Another food thing going on too David – 17a. Can’t imagine eating that either.

  3. Wendy Simpson says:

    Goodness, guys, have only just printed it. Lol!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      It is like being in a lolly shop. I used to follow David in the Courier Mail every Saturday and as often as possible in a Sydney paper. If I recall he was published daily. The major newspapers print absolute rubbish, so I can hardly wait for Wednesday morning.

      • Wendy Simpson says:

        Yes, couldn’t wait for Adelaide’s Saturday Advertiser, and had Sunday to mull it over. Stopped buying the paper when it got axed!!!

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    Who?… Me? …another Stickler Tragic?…Yup!…You bet………..

  5. Christine Hulley says:

    Stuck on 1d and 18a. Got the rest.

  6. Christine Hulley says:

    Not 18a but 15a, can’t read lol.

    • Christine Hulley says:

      OK! Got the last one. Never heard of it before though.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        I had not heard of it, but references indicate that it is an elongated punctuation mark. Presumably the first two letters come from a printers measure.

  7. Richard Sternes says:

    All came with a rush at the end.
    Needed assistance with 14d, got entangled with “vets”.
    Should have been right onto it – Anzac Day next week.
    15a – like everyone else. …..16a couldn’t get untangled from “rustlers”.

    Pesky three-letter word this week – going with variation of a chair minus ‘a’ for 16d.
    Thought 5d was pretty “groovy”.
    Not only bankers get a run either – “setter” variation in 18d

    2d had me remembering yet again, much loved John Clarke (in Fred Dagg days) –
    trying to get the fleece back on the sheep when the wool price dropped.

    Broad & interesting range of challenges yet again David.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Agree with you all the way. Many delightful clues. But 28a also merits an honourable mention.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Yes, became entangled there too Arthur –
        the endless “father” options.
        Four-letter conundrum for the week.

  8. Wendy Simpson says:

    13a is my pick, never heard of the word-thanks google. Always like to learn a new word!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Richard and I had some concerns about solitary as a noun rather than an adjective. I have only a few references but they replace the final vowel with ic to make it an adjective.

      Still I will go with the flow and accept that God and I know everything and that’s one of the things God knows.

  9. Richard Sternes says:

    Life Long Learning
    With words especially it can never be – All Done.
    Isn’t that Great.

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