The Stickler Weekly 182 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



9-across


11-across



18-across


24-across

26-across


1-down

2-down

3-down

5-down

6-down

7-down


13-down

16-down

17-down

18-down




The answer is a jumbling of letters except for the initial or final letter of the anagram fodder. An anagram indicator and truncation indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

Punctuation generally should be ignored - always consider how a clue reads without punctuation.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

A word or phrase that defines the answer. All cryptic clues usually have a minimum of one definition which will be located at the beginning or end of the clue.
A word or series of words that signify the position of wordplay elements in the answer.

Examples: before, after, leading, in the middle of, under (down only) etc.

The entire answer can be discovered by mixing up letters. An appropriate anagram indicator will be present.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

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12 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 182 Clue Hints

  1. Steve C says:

    Couple of new words this week David with 1d and 5d requiring dictionary help. 7d is your most devious clue this week,”digital screens” and “play” as a noun had me puzzled for a long time. Other notables are 18 and 25a and 16d. Well done!

  2. Wendy Simpson says:

    My picks are 26a and 16d-clever.
    Either this week is a bit easier or I am getting better at these-hopefully the latter!!!

  3. Arthur Maynard says:

    Still a work in progress, but must comment on my laugh out loud moments. 27A a bottler &lit and 21a temporarily misleading.

    5d is often mentioned on Gardening Australia. Like Wendy I like both 26a and 16d because of the challenges.

    David’s hints helped me with 11a 24a which I should have woken up to independently. The hint for the definition of 13d made that fall into place.

    Only a couple to go now.

  4. Arthur Maynard says:

    Finally, with the help of Mr Google.
    I agree with Steve 7d is Devious! It was second last in as I finally discarded IT and worked on the clue hint as a noun. I could not believe the word, until I thought it through and it fits perfectly. It would cause a few eyes to roll in my U3A group.

    1d was my last. Had to resort to crossword solver when I had all the cross letters but nothing seemed to fit. Thoroughly enjoyed the outcome as I found a number of examples on You-Tube. I found some sheet music, and a variety of performances which indicated you can do what you want in this activity, provided you are in a team or a side. I would like to see Andre Rieu couple this with the Radetzky March in one of his performances.

    Top marks again for the challenge and the educational opportunity.

  5. Richard Sternes says:

    Yes to All-of-the-Above. Still puzzling over WHY? for 27a,
    4d (thinking Chess – tho not a player) & 21d can’t see the Arabs connection.

    Meanwhile – in need of additional Diversional Therapy
    have been re-working No 38 of June 16, 2o14. How quickly we forget!!!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      21d The Arabs are animals, with the Australian bred ones much in demand in Singapore and the middle east. In 2000 I had a lot of fun researching issues relating to GST on the sale and export, particularly when there were delays between sale and departure.

      27a This could be considered a visual clue. It really tickled my fancy.

      4a certainly has the chess connection. I wondered why the corner until I found the starting position with t he help of my friend Google.

      I last looked at 38 in October 2015 when my U3A group solved it. A quick look tells me there are some interesting clues there, so I will not revisit it while I wait for next Wednesday.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Many Thanks Arthur
        21d – Of Course – didn’t even enter my mind.
        27a – requires more Pondering, me thinks….
        4a – you’ve done the Chess research – didn’t consider that either.

        & whilst on post-completion wrap-up,
        let’s not overlook the Alphabet Soup that was – 1a

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          Richard 27a is not “ot” it is “OT” and it has nothing to do with the bible. Now think visual and cryptic.

          For sheer joy, this has to be my pick of the week.

          I needed the crosses to help solve the alphabet soup.

          In my early post I should have said “now” not “not”

          • Athur Maynard says:

            Think obese. He won the Melbourne Cup in the early 1970’s

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Gosh! Arthur – Thanks for your persistence.
            Life will always have its mysteries & 27a has been yet another.
            Large – overtime? large, decapped non-cool? perhaps not!!!
            Only one more sleep.

  6. Arthur Maynard says:

    This is one I will remember for a long time, and will probably quote often. It is like naked president (5) I share it often and smile broadly when I repeat it.