The Stickler Weekly 197 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.







14-across

16-across


19-across


23-across

24-across


1-down

3-down





9-down

15-down


18-down

21-down


The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
A word or phrase that defines the answer. All cryptic clues usually have a minimum of one definition which will be located at the beginning or end of the clue.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

There is only one part to this clue, a definition, and it's usually a play on words. There aren't any indicators.
The answer is hidden inside the clue in reverse order. There are two indicators: one to signify that a hidden word is present; the other to reverse the letters.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The entire answer is found by reversing part of the clue, or a synonym for part of the clue. A suitable reversal indicator will be present.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
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14 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 197 Clue Hints

  1. Wendy Simpson says:

    Help with 15d, might have 26a wrong
    Any ideas anyone?
    .

  2. Arthur Maynard says:

    Early days yet, but must say I like 20a. Reminiscent of my yachting days because if you got too much, you just might get it, and start looking for the pickup boat.

    I have not got as far as 15d or 26a yet.

    • Wendy Simpson says:

      Yes, 20a is a good one, also enjoyed 8d-a word I haven’t heard for a while.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        Agree about 8d. I occasionally encounter it in recipe books. I love the clue construction.
        15d is new to me. It is a botanic reference which has everything to do with fertilisation – hence male. David has given us “state” for political power. I played with words 2 and 3 to get the middle. then asked my friend google. There are two a’s which leads to confusion about where the a of state goes.
        I like 20a. Very sneaky. I have 2 words for bullies, with the child being male.
        A wry smile for 16a when I realised what the mistake was.
        I also enjoyed the trip to Europe evoked by 19a.
        I am having trouble with the northwest corner. But it is still day one and I am confident of a couple of crosses.

        • Wendy Simpson says:

          Ok, so I did have it correct, must be mistake elsewhere because I’m not getting Congrats message

  3. Richard Sternes says:

    Struggling with 15d too Wendy as well as 12a.
    Also seem to have a “Why Is It So” – at 24a.
    Haven’t been to Clue Hints yet, but Arthur may have got me to 15d without.
    Therefore the male child works at 26a.
    Have a very good friend/ace cook who keeps me well supplied with hearty variants @ 8d.
    Always Loved the Chooks so got a genuine ****** at 4d.
    Shades of current Jane Hutcheon/One To One promo & dear old Tom Kennealy.

  4. Arthur Maynard says:

    It is time to buy the tee shirt.
    Hard to pick the podium this week.
    The aforementioned 15d. I don’t know where David finds these words, but at my age I have to keep learning new things.
    1a took some work and only emerged with the help of the crosses.
    12a I have just woken up to the fact that I was trying to delete the wrong word. This led to a swap and the correct anagram and deletion.
    24a Has to be a contender. I parsed this by asking myself What’s ….? It works for both solution and definition. David may have better reasons.
    The alternate use of the definition in 1d also makes it attractive.
    So take your pick for the gold logie, or nominate your own.

  5. Arthur Maynard says:

    Just had another look at 18d. Veerrry clever! I come back to it and have to work it out all over again.

  6. Richard Sternes says:

    I think all my contenders are mentioned above. Another great week.
    24a was major Light-Bulb moment. Was really bothering me.
    People with genuine concerns often ask “what’s wrong?” OR “what’s *** ******”
    This has to be my Pick of the Week.

  7. Christine Hulley says:

    Another good one, liked 18d, new word for me.

  8. Greg Mansell says:

    15d was a new word for me. I enjoyed a couple of tricky definitions: 24a, and 2d’s first definition. 4d was good fun.

  9. Arthur Maynard says:

    15d I was not completely happy with the abbreviation which is contained in this solution. However Google has pointed me to several references which indicate that it is sound. It certainly applies if you are awarded a particular academic degree related to theology.
    We learn new things every day. Two lots of new stuff from one clue. Now that’s value for money.
    I look forward to the solution on Wednesday to see whether my reasoning stands up.