The Stickler Weekly 199 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


5-across

10-across

12-across


16-across

18-across

19-across

23-across

25-across

26-across

28-across

1-down


3-down


8-down

14-down


18-down

20-down

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The answer is hidden inside the clue in reverse order. There are two indicators: one to signify that a hidden word is present; the other to reverse the letters.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The answer is a jumbling of letters except for the initial or final letter of the anagram fodder. An anagram indicator and truncation indicator will be present.
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36 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 199 Clue Hints

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    Just started, and have only a few words. However

    1a appears very topical if you are into that particular pastime. Some other words fit with my solution, so I will continue working, and hope I am not wrong.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Very pleased that my original idea worked out. Topical but not beyond the reach of non-believers like me.

      • Greg Mansell says:

        I thought 1a might be tough for those who aren’t devotees of that soul-destroying activity which happens to be my sport of choice.

  2. Arthur Maynard says:

    Excellent. The tip for 28a clarified my thinking. I did not like my original word and the on line grid did not give me a pass. An unusual word, and a well crafted clue.
    Love 10a, with the alternate thinking for the contained word.
    19a Just had to work at it and build the word.
    Like 3d for the lateral thinking.
    20a is up there with the best.

  3. Christine Hulley says:

    Stuck on 1d (got the syndicate reference but not the, I assume, three letter word meaning negotiation that goes into it) and 9a, no idea.

    • Christine Hulley says:

      Pretty certain I have both of them now but not getting the congrats message so have got errors somewhere.

      • Christine Hulley says:

        Yay! Got it, 5a was wrong. 12a had me rattled and 10a had a word for brownie that I had never heard of.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Same sticking points Christine.
      Three letter ‘negotiation’ eluding me & clueless on 9a.
      Still early days.
      Overall & elsewhere yet another immensely satisfying Challenge.
      Thank You, David……….

      • Christine Hulley says:

        I was up the same tree and now realise I was wrong. The definition is ‘rapid negotiation’.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          9a – I’m thinking what was used to set off the crackers on Cracker Night. Still doesn’t help with 1d tho…..

          • Richard Sternes says:

            1d – Assuming I have the “syndicate” correct, could also be worn on the finger?

          • Christine Hulley says:

            Richard, yes, it can be worn on the finger and the three letter word you need is another word for behind, think ships.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Eventually fell over the line with 1d Christine
            & Thanks. Now it’s right up there with Picks of the Week.

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    Right Arthur – staying with original thought on 1a but with corrected spelling (say!!!)
    Has connection to 24d.
    Major holes NW & SE corners. Loved Alphabet Soups as always – 2d & 7d.
    Likewise Christine, clueless on 1d plus 12a, 19a, 14d amongst others.
    Early days yet & haven’t been to Clue Hints either…….YAY…!!!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I did not even notice the connection.
      1d. Think laterally about the definition. There is a container indication.
      12a is another of your beloved alphabet soups
      19a This needs to be built up from very small pieces.
      14d think laterally about “close”.
      Lots of lateral thinking in this puzzle, but plenty of meat to keep you interested

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Still struggling with 1d Arthur but seem to have 9a (Cracker Night connection).
        Had all the others, but seem to have a spare “L” in 14d.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          Yes there could be a cracker night connection in 9. which stars with Fellow.
          1d – Christine has wrote that the definition is rapid negotiation. which leaves behind breaking syndicate.
          Thus the word for behind must break syndicate, whereas I think you have tried to find a word for negotiation to put behind the syndicate – but that means the word breaking should not be in the clue. It seems you have the middle letter of this three letter word. This is an adventurous activity and my then 25 year old son who jumped out of perfectly good aeroplanes declined to join me when I suggested he accompany me on an outing.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Yes Arthur – I’m sticking with Cracker Night for 9a
            & we are on song with 1d – swift water activity.
            (Unforgettable Canadian Rockies trip years ago.)
            Not unlike rain & hail the just passed thru here, gutters awash & headed your way.
            Not too severe despite predictions.

          • Christine Hulley says:

            How would you negotiate a rapid? Big clue.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Yes Christine – in the end, all so bleeding obvious!!!

  5. Greg Mansell says:

    1a: a tough one for people who have no interest, or only a passing interest, in the activity in question
    19a: a beautifully constructed clue
    28a: I’d only seen this one in verb form before. I got there via all the cross letters, plus what ended up being fairly straightforward wordplay. But then, a lot of David’s wordplay seems straightforward after the fact…
    1d: loved the definition
    8d: loved “ready to drop”.
    By the way, does anyone else out there have a special ritual for completing The Stickler? For instance, I always use one of my small collection of fountain pens, after printing it on premium fountain-pen-friendly paper. It allows me to combine a couple of my interests. Also, I work full-time in IT, so it’s nice to swap screen/mouse/keyboard for pen & paper for a while.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      My only ritual is to work through all the across clues, then the down clues on my first pass. The novice group I work with seeks out the three and four letter words. In the advanced group the first to get a word sets the start point, and we work grids around that. We work on puzzles which are at least a year old, so I have to solve the puzzles all over again.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Print off hard copy. Quick run thru Top to Bottom – then reverse.
        Couple of ‘potentials’ if lucky, then get a bit more focused & it just happens from there. Always a trick or two at the end – e.g. this weeks 1d & 9a.

  6. Christine Hulley says:

    9a is devilishly simple. Fellow = f. Handles ? What do you attach to explosives to make them work?

  7. Steve C says:

    Yay, finally got the online congrats, it was quite difficult this week David with 1d, 9a and 10a giving me grief. Liked 5a and 25a, well done ??

  8. Steve C says:

    Forgot to thank the other online bloggers who helped immensely with their “extra hints” and discussions, ta

  9. Wendy Simpson says:

    My pick would be 1d, quite deceptive. Another great cryptic, thanks, David.

  10. Arthur Maynard says:

    I have just been reading back over the blog and noted that on Thursday Richard was concerned he may have an L in 14d which he could not account for. I thought I had responded, but find I did not. So if you have not worked it out, the second “l” comes from “the end of long”.
    I do not like loose ends, but if I’m teaching you to suck eggs at this late stage, then the yolk’s on me.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Not at all Arthur.
      More we all share our thoughts, more proficient we will become.
      I thoroughly enjoy all this.
      Ditto re loose ends.
      I had contented myself with front end of “long” rather than back end.