The Stickler Weekly 201 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.




11-across

12-across

14-across

15-across

19-across


23-across

29-across

1-down

2-down


4-down


9-down

13-down

16-down

18-down




The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
All words can be validly written with a leading capital without changing their meaning. Hence, the capitalisation of a word may present a different picture than is intended.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
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46 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 201 Clue Hints

  1. Christine Hulley says:

    Stuck in NW corner. Brain worked great for a while but has now bid me goodbye.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Do have 5a Christine. It’s all there & a bit spicy.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Sorry Christine – misread. I’m now stuck NW as well (not NE).
        Do have & sure of 3d may help “small pool” is definition,
        “pipe ” not what you might expect, think sound.

    • Greg Mansell says:

      Yes, the NW corner was the last section I completed, too.

  2. Richard Sternes says:

    Stuck in entire Northern Hemisphere Christine – hence attendance Here!!!

  3. Michael Kaiser says:

    Lost in NE corner. 1a and 2d and 14a. Don’t understand the “net” final clue. Don’t understand the “character” type clue. Can’t get the slang answer for eat in 1a to agree with the slang answer for drink in 1a so can’t get started on 2d.

  4. Michael Kaiser says:

    Never mind. Figured it out although the clueing for 10a still eludes me.

  5. Steve Clarke says:

    I too am having trouble with the NW corner, the words I have for 1 and 2 down make 10 and 14 across awkward. I can understand the clue in 10 across but the definition doesn’t fit and can’t find a word to fit in with my 1st and 3rd letters in 14a. I have a small pool in 3d but can’t see a pipe surrounding a double diameter. Bit of a mess no wonder I don’t have any congratulations 😢

  6. Richard Sternes says:

    Seems we are all in the same boat – 1a, 10a, 14a & 1d, 2d.
    About to put aside & revisit later.
    Tip for 3d Steve “pipe” is rare usage, not what you would first expect & rare word.
    Think sound/noise

  7. Cathy says:

    Stuck with 6d, 11a and NW corner. Do have 3D however. All help gratefully received.

  8. Christine Hulley says:

    Now just stuck on 14a, have no idea.

  9. Christine Hulley says:

    Got 14a now but don’t understand the clue. Not getting congrats so something else is wrong. Suspect 1a, 10a or 3d but can’t see why they would being anything else?

  10. Steve Clarke says:

    Thank you Richard I found the word in the dictionary, rare indeed.
    Cathy, in 6d “general”is the definition then think of a shortened term for muscles and stretch as a noun. In 11a “support unit” is the definition then look at the clue one step at a time taking notice of David’s hint

  11. Richard Sternes says:

    Cathy – 6d definition is “general” – muscles = six pack (three letters)
    other five letters think “stretch” of land.
    11a – the “Mac” is wearable
    10a – have an answer but not entirely convinced (rare usage)
    & often comes with a “be” in front. Zilch to do with cooking.
    Steve is onto these.
    & yes 1a, 10a (maybe), 14a + 1d & 2d all still causing Grief………

  12. Richard Sternes says:

    Oh Boy! Sheer brilliance in NW Corner, no wonder it was a challenge.
    1a had real fizz, will give the Double Definition.
    10a now happy (as above)
    14a seems to be a Hidden Answer but like Christine, can’t get comfortable with cluing.
    1d is literally answer “Twelve”
    2d then will be too easy, just join the dots.
    They just keep getting better David……………….

  13. Cathy says:

    I have them all now…..thank goodness. I can relax! Thank you all for your help.

    I agree, some real challenges.

    Cheers Cathy

  14. Greg Mansell says:

    Some really tricky clues in this one. My highlights:
    1a: tricky first definition. Please keep me topped up with definition 2.
    11a: clever definition
    14a: “tall type of male” – v. tricky, but I loved it
    19a: nice definition
    20a: not difficult, and a bit grisly, but as perfectly constructed as a cryptic clue can be
    1d: for once I wasn’t fooled by the definition
    2d: nice definition
    13d: I enjoyed the construction

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Yes Greg – ALL these amongst my “Picks of The Week” too.
      Still not entirely comfortable with 14a.
      Need to Ponder a little more in the aftermath

  15. Arthur Maynard says:

    This week was a real bobby dazzler. New words and new uses for old words.
    I was slow to start, then got the wind in my sails before arriving in the doldrums for the final 3. 7d was last in.
    Loved the cross reference in 1d, and the anagrams (Richard’s favourites), and 27a tickled my fancy.
    13d was a challenge which had me back and forth before the light went on. I think this was a great clue. Some may disagree about the good child although my granddaughter fits the bill.
    Needed David’s hints for 4d which is actually very simple, 2d because I had trouble with the parsing.
    5a and the pipe in 3d were totally unknown before today.
    Congrats to the early successes.
    This puzzle is Oscar worthy. Thank you.

  16. Christine Hulley says:

    I think I have them all but no congrats message so missing something?

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      5d was my sticking point. It is a word I have seen in books set in England and Scotland, and I’ve not heard it used in an Australian context. It is a double definition. and there are only 2 letters to play with.
      There was some early discussion about 10a but the meaning is in the dictionary. Richard also provided the two letters which are usually associated with this word in this context.
      27a I puzzled about why the solution was not plural, but it was the first word which came to mind and it fits the word play beautifully.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        If you are still thinking about 5d. Most dictionaries cover one definition. Miriam Webster gave the best explanation of the second meaning. It makes me think of the fox hunts in England.

      • Greg Mansell says:

        27a: The solution isn’t plural because the definition isn’t plural.

  17. Christine Hulley says:

    Got it at last! Had one letter wrong in 16d, had an I rather than an O. Very challenging this week. Looking forward to seeing the explanations for 10a, 14a and 27a. Well done David. I can stop overthinking now 🙄

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      16d. Like you, I started with an “I” but found the definition is one word not 2. and the “o” was needed for the crazy person.
      14a Parsing eludes me. I am not sure where “tall” fits. I expected to reverse the solution.
      27a I interpreted this as the opposite of “outskirts of New York = NY”. Thus x fills y.
      However I have been known to be wrong before.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Christine
      10a – discussion above should put your mind to rest.
      14a – I too await this
      27a – starts ‘on foot’

    • Greg Mansell says:

      14a: Think about how David sometimes uses “type” or “types” in a clue, and then find a tall example.

  18. Christine Hulley says:

    Still not comfortable with 10a and 14a but I am sure I will bow to David’s better parsing once he enlightens us!

  19. Norman says:

    Help! Still having problems with 1A and 1D.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Norman
      David hints that 1a is a double definition. 2 words for the first definition and one for the second. The first syllable of word 1 is not one usually associated with humans. The second word was liberally applied earlier this week.

      1d. David hints “Twelve” – another clue; “sticking” is used as an inclusion indicator. Pull that apart and you will find that this is another answer for what 12a is. It is a charade there is an insurgent sticking (inside) the drug trafficker who is up. That only leaves the first letter which is common to 1a and 1d. And the final word describes accurately what 12a is. A beautifully crafted clue.
      The drug trafficker is not a dealer, but is essential in the transaction.

      • Norman says:

        Thanks Arthur. I’ll have a go with this info you provided. Hopefully I’ll get there.

      • Norman says:

        Though I got 1D I couldn’t explain it. Thanks to your help I now can. Thanks.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          I assume you have broken out the celebration drink

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Just checking back before we start all over again tomorrow. YAY!!!
            Really enjoined this exchange as Wrap for last week.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            No I didn’t enjoin the exchange I just enjoyed it!!!
            Bloody Auto-Spellcheck always thinks it knows better. …..Rarely is this ever so.
            Like Norman I had the answer – 1d – but it took awhile to work out Why.

  20. Greg Mansell says:

    It’s a big day tomorrow. In chronological order (and descending order of importance):
    1. The Stickler Weekly 202
    2. Same-sex marriage survey result announced
    3. Socceroos vs Honduras
    …with a likely sprinkling of further dual-citizenship chaos.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Greg I think that makes for a HUGE Day on all fronts.
      So long as I have (1.) I’ll manage to cope with the rest (just).
      & I would say this is a First – Dialogue continued Round-the-Week.
      Always hoped that might happen one day.