The Stickler Weekly 202 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



8-across

9-across

11-across

14-across

17-across


23-across


25-across

26-across

27-across

28-across

1-down

2-down

3-down

6-down

7-down

15-down

16-down


21-down


The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

A word or series of words that signify the position of wordplay elements in the answer.

Examples: before, after, leading, in the middle of, under (down only) etc.

A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
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29 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 202 Clue Hints

  1. Christine Hulley says:

    Finished and got the congrats. Liked 7d but not certain about 28a.

  2. Michael Kaiser says:

    Totally baffled by 18d….don’t even understand the hint.t.

  3. Wendy Simpson says:

    Crikey, barely finished last weeks!
    So busy atm. See how I go this week.

  4. Steve Clarke says:

    Also finished, some excellent clues this week. Liked 5d, 7d, 18d and 27a.
    Thanks David.

  5. Richard Sternes says:

    Off to a flying start, then fell over at 17a (what’s with the punctuation mark???)
    Still pondering 27a & 3d. Clue Hints my help after a visit.
    Liked your Likes Steve.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      17a The punctuation mark is the key. My pick as one of the better clues.
      27a What is the sign that something is wrong?
      3d The definition is at the front. The rest is a charade with an abbreviation to start. I like this clue, but I cannot find where the book fits.
      With all the early finishers I thought this would be easy. There was some rest for the wicked, but the going got tough later.
      I got the congrats, but I cannot parse 1d or 11a.
      16d exercised my brain for too long before the penny dropped.
      2d is simple but effective.
      Another enjoyable romp, and more relaxed than last week.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Arthur –
        17a “Still Baffled” writes…
        3d is fiendish, just when I think I have it, it slips away again.
        1d the order is (r)iver + green + greatly/much.
        11a is spirited activity, split by volcano.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          Thanks
          1d and 11a now clear as crystal. I could not get away from the v for volcano or Vesuvius.

          17a I had to read the clue aloud including the punctuation mark. The definition is 4 words.
          I gather that you have 3d which is similar in construction to 17a, once you get started.

  6. Norman says:

    Struggled with 6D and 12A but got them eventually. 19A also tricky.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I was not certain about 19a until I got the congrats. Now I can remember asking my sons “what are you doing?” when there was mischief afoot.

  7. Richard Sternes says:

    Could not go past my beloved Alphabet Soups (yet again) 9a, 25a, 4d, 7d
    But also thought 11a (see above) 3d (ditto), 6d, 16d & 22d (monumental contradiction)
    all worthy of note.

  8. Greg Mansell says:

    I knocked this one off in under an hour – which is possibly a record for me.
    17a: my favourite. I love the “Aha!” moment of clues like this.
    19a: liked the definition
    25a: another nice definition
    27a: I do like an Aussie-flavoured clue…
    5d: …and a sporting reference.
    By the way, it’s about time I renewed my subscription – which I now do for every 25 crosswords. The PayPal transaction is on its way. Take note, regulars.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Greg
      You were faster than me. I got away to a good start, but failed some of the hurdles until I got my head into gear.
      I agree with all your selections, and noted the sporting references with Augusta and the green. ?
      6d deserves a mention because I certainly had to engage more than one dictionary.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Yes Greg, a Subscription reminder is always appropriate.
      Liked all your Likes too,
      especially when I stopped myself being distracted – (5d)
      wandering off down some Fairway, then getting lost in the Rough.
      Just loved 17a – when I eventually ‘Got It’

  9. Arthur Maynard says:

    I think it is okay to ask now because most people will have completed the journey.

    In 3d What is the relevance of “reference book”. “Add to” seems to be enough definition with the word play in “except for the beginning and end.” providing all the information I needed.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      After the blog I saw an alternative. I read except (standard abbreviation) then the beginning, and end.
      It may be a “reference book except for the beginning” ergo tEXT and END

      Either way works, and David will clear it up on Wednesday.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        Fancy that. David’s hint for 3d records book = text. So my original thoughts leave two extra words, which makes it wrong. Right answer wrong reason. A least I am no longer puzzled.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          So very glad you got there in the end Arthur.
          I am still were I was (above)
          just when I think I have IT – it slips away again.

  10. Richard Sternes says:

    Perhaps it is timely to add
    for those who take a little longer to meet this Weekly Challenge
    DO NOT BE DISCOURAGED.
    Stick with The Stickler as I did & in no time
    what once was completely & totally, baffling & mystifying
    soon become only very occasionally so……..

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