The Stickler Weekly 203 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



3-across

11-across




19-across

21-across

22-across

26-across

27-across


2-down

5-down

6-down

8-down

10-down

14-down

15-down


20-down

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
All words can be validly written with a leading capital without changing their meaning. Hence, the capitalisation of a word may present a different picture than is intended.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

This entry was posted in Stickler Weekly Clue Help, The Stickler and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 203 Clue Hints

  1. Cathy says:

    Help!! I have everything but 3 across and its driving me crazy that I cant get it.
    Any clues anyone?

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I’ve still got 2 to go. 2d and 5d
      But definition for 3a is terrific grounding, say. A for letter word and an anagram will give it to you.
      But you would not want to be there for it.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        Now I’ve got 2 d. I had to go slow on the springing up.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          And finally 5d. I thought I had it all done, but cannot get the congrats.
          5d takes the Oscar for me, as it was my last in but turned out to be very simple.
          On to the awards. I may have to eat my words
          3a took a long time to get the definition. Terrific is not terrific good.
          11a had me looking at progeny, but none of them worked.
          13a Great clue with some slang thrown in.
          26a I was up the garden path for the definition so I qualify this one as tricky.
          2d was a word I had to work at, as it is a symptom I had not encountered.
          Love 4d. So simple, but totally misleading.
          6d Many good old standbys in the charade.
          Today’s blog was relevant to the crossword.
          Now back to find out where I have gone wrong.

  2. Arthur Maynard says:

    I must have butterfingers. Tried the on line version in “Edge” and missed the congrats
    Same thing in Firefox and “Eureka”. So I’m off to find a Rufus. Incidentally I gave myu beginners group a Stickler (number 1 of 1998) and they were rapt. They Commented on the clarity of cluing. They have only been at it for 1 year so I was quite proud of them for their solving, and their ability to distinguish good clueing.

  3. Steve Clarke says:

    Was about to give up but finally got the northwest corner including 3a. Liked 3a, 14a, 27a, 10d and 20d. Thanks David 👍🏻

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    More that usual in the Light Bulb Dept.
    Liked all your Picks of the Week, Arthur. – 3a & 2d were true Gems.
    Also thought 19a (THAT Soup again),
    8d (got a Bang out of that) & 10d (Soup again) – worthy of note.
    Getting too good at this. Now it’s SIX sleeps….. But need to be careful.
    Hubris may attract attention for David.!!!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Hubris may even attract an interesting clue

      • Richard Sternes says:

        heart of wheel, by chance almost…..?

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          So far so good. I like your word play, now you need to add a definition. perhaps “generates hauteur.” So it would read Heart of wheel, by chance almost generates hauteur. (6)
          Fair enough for a quick sortie into foreign territory.

  5. Wendy Simpson says:

    Finally got the Congrats
    3a would have to be my pick for this week, very clever.
    11a had me bemused for a while too.

  6. Christine Hulley says:

    Bit slow this week but got there at last!

  7. Cathy S says:

    4d was not a given for me. The lack of a hint to solve it was the only hint that it was a no brainer. Oh well.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I believe it is a double definition Hang around Vienna say.
      Vienna say (for example) is a loaf of bread. To hang around is to loaf about without any real purpose.

      Similar construction to naked president (5)