The Stickler Weekly 204 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.




13-across


16-across

23-across

25-across

26-across

28-across

29-across




5-down



8-down

11-down

12-down


18-down


The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
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12 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 204 Clue Hints

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    Very interesting. I particularly like 19a which appears readily from a couple of crosses and recent events. But the parsing set me a challenge worthy of David’s blog today.

    26a is also interesting because of the parsing.

    10a is cool and 8d is a classic.

  2. Christine Hulley says:

    A good one again. Favourite this week was 8d.

  3. Cathy says:

    Yes congratulations on another very enjoyable challenge David. Always a highlight of the middle of the week. I also haven’t quite got the parsing of 19a or 24d but have the words. Thank you.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      24d There is a colloquial name for malicious gossip. Put an a inside. Forget the mafia, but it is similar.

      19a is a charade of 4 parts. Since you have the word, it is not a stretch to accept it as a synonym for what is in the clue.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        I meant “since you have the word, it is not a stretch to accept the last part of the charade as a synonym for what is in the clue.”

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    Liked all of the above Picks of the Week
    5a can be but One Group, 9a trick answer wasting time on that other definition,
    19a excellent construction, 26a in-sane indeed, Major light bulb moment.
    5d SO – singular can be plural, 8d last in, loved it, another for those of “certain age”
    & 18d construction again.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Thank You once again David, for another Highlight of the Week.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      5d Apparently most zero plural words (where the words do not change) are animals – deer is an example. Another learning this week. By the time I am 100 I will be really smart

  5. Steve Clarke says:

    Thanks David, another difficult one. 8d is a gem, also liked 26a and 11d (“company supplier” is very good) 👍🏻

  6. Wendy Simpson says:

    8d is my pick, as Richard said-for people of a certain age.

  7. Greg Mansell says:

    Late again – still catching up.
    26a: the language-abuse-indicating “?” was well and truly warranted
    11d & 27d: a couple of clever definitions.
    Overall, #204 was pretty tough for me.