The Stickler Weekly 207 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across


9-across

11-across

12-across

15-across



28-across


2-down

5-down




10-down



19-down

21-down



The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
Punctuation generally should be ignored - always consider how a clue reads without punctuation.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A word or phrase that defines the answer. All cryptic clues usually have a minimum of one definition which will be located at the beginning or end of the clue.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
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9 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 207 Clue Hints

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    A very satisfying puzzle with some interesting contexts to challenge standard thinking – I think this is engendered by insights this week.
    New words at 11a and 7d. 7d took me back to more traditional definitions, so there was an extra dictionary involved. 11a I was stuck on one very familiar word, and had to check my dictionary when I had the correct answer (which was bugging me from the start)
    23a seems a bit tongue in cheek, but was a LOL for me.
    29a should be right up Richard’s alley.

    Obviously nothing better to do to day, so I have put the time into this.

  2. Cathy says:

    Always good to learn new words, eg 11a. Thanks David for yet another great midweek puzzle and all that have come before this year.
    All the best for a great Christmas. I look forward to many more vocabulary expanding challenges from you in 2018. Cheers Cathy

  3. Richard Sternes says:

    Yes Arthur – before I went into Head Office 1970,
    would like to think I acted more ethically at 29a than many do these days.
    CBA has been a sorry saga of late. Former CEO David Murray who I knew well
    famously & often used to relate “I used to be a Teller”. They need to revisit that model.
    7d was no surprise but have no idea where I would have encountered that before.
    I’ll leave aside Picks of the Week to pay tribute to word-plays – the amusement & delights they bring, frequently with a wry smile. Would love to be able to think like that David.
    Few examples amongst many that really appealed – 1a, 4a, 15a 1d, 16d & 19d
    & loved the Alphabet Soups – of course.

    • Greg Mansell says:

      Being married to a woman, 7d is a word that I’ve heard many times – usually when standing at a jeweller’s window.

  4. Steve Clarke says:

    New words for me at 11a and 7d, loved the “bar worker” at 1a also liked 12a, 23a and21d. Thank you David and have a very Happy Christmas ??

  5. Wendy Simpson says:

    My pick would 1a, nice little deception.

  6. Greg Mansell says:

    Nice definitions in 1a, 18a, 26a & 19d.
    28d: I liked “flighty singer”.
    Overall, #207 was around Apatite (5) on the Hardness Scale.

  7. Christine Hulley says:

    I missed this crossword completely! So am now a week behind grrrr …