The Stickler Weekly 209 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across



15-across

19-across

24-across



1-down



8-down

9-down

13-down

16-down

17-down

20-down

23-down


A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
Punctuation generally should be ignored - always consider how a clue reads without punctuation.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

A word or series of words that signify the position of wordplay elements in the answer.

Examples: before, after, leading, in the middle of, under (down only) etc.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

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10 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 209 Clue Hints

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    So easy to waltz up the garden path today. I had a few set ideas which did not seem to work.
    24a was most difficult for me, but it is really simple when you see it.
    3a I love the cemetery regular reference.
    10a Wonderful &lit. Nothing wasted.
    29a Devious but readily solvable from the clue
    1d, 9d, and 20d are well worthy of mention.

    True to your insights, you have set a challenging puzzle, with all clues able to be solved without specialised knowledge or forensic detective work.

  2. Steve Clarke says:

    I agree with Arthur, a great crossword today, with some very challenging clues. 10a is genius, like a self licking ice cream it needs nothing else. Also like the same other clues as Arthur as well as 19a and 17d . Thanks David 👍🏼

  3. Richard Sternes says:

    Struggling right across top half.
    Some guidance on 10a would surely assist. Totally bereft of ideas.
    Don’t know if I’m in a shop, with an Abacus or on a firing range. Or all Three!!!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Richard it is one of your beloved alphabet soups. It is consumable and you will get it at a counter in a particular type of glass. It is a lol minute when you get it.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Yes Thanks, Arthur – think I’ve got it, but not sure I “get” it
        & indeed as well as &Lit it’s quite an Alphabet Soup.
        Now to tidy up 1d & 2d.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          I never had the “pleasure” of this stuff, but it was the best think in the 90’s when my sons were in their party days. I am not certain you can draw a definition as such, because the &lit has a touch of the cryptic to it.

          1a. David explains balance which puts the definition (which is a verb) at the front. Once you have that concept it will fall into place.

          2d just needs careful reading of the clue and substitution of one word for another in the wordplay.

  4. Christine Hulley says:

    10a was brilliant. Also liked 29a.

  5. Richard Sternes says:

    In accord with All now – 10a is a Masterpiece. Needs straight read through.
    Liked everyones Picks of The Week.
    Would add 12a, 26a, 28a (of course Arthur) 2d, 6d, & 13d
    Oh & 1d THOSE Zeros, what a Trick. Last In.
    All Up – nothing not to like here – Thank You David.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      PS>>>
      Forget the “shot” @ 10a – tinkle of ice in crystal then good hefty splash!!!

  6. Greg Mansell says:

    I’m joining the chorus in praise of 10a. Other nice moments:
    1a: “rights”
    3d: “cemetery regular”
    20d: my last word in. Simple, elegant…and deceptive.
    And a question for David: In 18a, I didn’t know whether “backed” applied to what preceded it, or what followed it, until I had a cross letter. Is there a convention here?