The Stickler Weekly 210 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across


10-across

11-across


18-across

22-across

24-across

26-across

27-across

28-across

1-down


5-down



16-down

18-down



The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

All words can be validly written with a leading capital without changing their meaning. Hence, the capitalisation of a word may present a different picture than is intended.
The answer is found by using the sound of a word or phrase. Sounds-like indicators point the way.
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19 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 210 Clue Hints

  1. Steve Clarke says:

    Some great clues this week, including :-
    1a, 9a- gas-pipe made me laugh, 10a – landscaper sent me in the wrong direction, 12a -took me back a few years, 18a and 28a – they’ll laugh when they get this one.
    Thank you David 👍🏻

  2. Arthur Maynard says:

    Interesting hoops to jump through with the parsing of several clues, but I made sense of all but 1d. Even the clue hint does not help me. I will come back to it, but probably will not get it until next week. 6d, 11a,
    16d I had to find learn about an oneophile, and the second word was obvious.
    I agree with all Steve’s choices. Somehow I missed out on 12a as a child, father and grandfather. Apparently they have been around since 1946.
    28a is the standout today – those nuts!

  3. Wendy Simpson says:

    I haven’t got very far, but liked 16d, had to look up a certain word!

  4. Cathy says:

    Another great puzzle David, thank you. 28a made me laugh.

  5. Richard Sternes says:

    Another Very Tough Gig this week.
    Would not wish to find myself here so soon,
    but at about half done, what’s a guy to do.
    Steve & Arthur I am missing ALL your above mentions.
    Hopefully Clue Hints will provide some, well – HELP!!!

  6. Arthur Maynard says:

    Richard
    1d jumped out at me from the clue, and I cannot parse it. So I pencilled it in and it was confirmed by the crosses.
    1a David tells us that you need an American term for jail. I think it is more slang and should be familiar to readers of American who dunnits or watchers of American crime shows. People get put into the “???” If they have a rap sheet (insight). That tells you the definition is at the front. There is also an indicator that this is a container. Take it word by word and you should
    6d is a deletion.
    9a This is a container. Everybody has this gas pipe but you do not think of it in that context.
    10a Another of David’s containers. It is also a charade. The first two words are the definition with the perhaps means you need to look at alternatives for this landscaper.
    11a Charade clue (3 parts) “forward” =PERT. Clever word play for the final letter.
    12a You will probably need some crosses to get this. It was my last in. I googled the word and sure enough it is a child’s toy. (could we doubt it)
    18a Take it word by word. Rough is an anagram indicator. So the definition is at the end.
    28a David tells us that whole = ONE. It is a simple charade of three parts.
    16d Google oenophile
    Now I will add 19a and 22a to my picks of the week. Both simple, but beautifully clued.

  7. Richard Sternes says:

    Yes Arthur – Thank You for your trouble I did fall over the line – eventually,
    still pondering – Why is This So? – at 11a, 27a, 1d & 6d.
    Bemused by “landscaper” at 10a & “Great” at 18d. …So THAT’s what it’s called at 12a.
    My Picks of the Week are all previously mentioned – & would add 17d, nice tricky.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      1d beats me.
      6d Put one letter before your word and you get a word which means scrambled. How else can you get an omelet.
      11a The first word is the definition. Three letters for the first part of hte lcue, then David’s hint, then playing at the centre.
      27a You have the definition. A three letter word for wood is contained in a four letter word for a section of frame (which David describes as a physical structure)
      Yes I thought 17d was neat.

  8. Richard Sternes says:

    Thanks again Arthur.
    1d – not just me. …6d – yes think I have it.
    …11a – may have wrong word. …27a – Aaaah (light globe!!!)

    • Richard Sternes says:

      ..11a – Aaaah! – again. Correct word, (my) incorrect definition.
      Five more sleeps to 1d.
      Than you once again David. Another challenging & rewarding journey.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        Richard, I don’t know whether you are aware of this.
        I only recently found out that if you want to check you have the right words, you can fill in the PDF version, and hopefully get a message of congratulations.
        You do not learn how many words you have wrong, or which ones they are. But you can concentrate review all your answers and concentrate on getting the parsing right.

        • Steve Clarke says:

          It’s not the PDF (printed) version but the “online” version which gives you an interactive on screen grid that prints the words “congratulations you have completed the puzzle correctly” once you have done it correctly. It’s nice to have confirmation of your skill and saves you printing the grid, a much better way in my humble opinion 👍🏼

  9. Greg Mansell says:

    10a, 22a, 28a, 8d, 21d: clever definitions.
    27a: I liked “section of frame”.
    I think I’ve parsed 1d:
    * “very much” is a 2-letter word
    * “appreciated” (meaning “perceived”) is just there to help the surface reading
    * “each” is a (1,3) colloquial expression which I’ve heard before, and can be found in the Chambers Dictionary. “He bought 6 bottles of Grange at $700 x xxx” .
    * “generation” is a 3-letter word.
    I’m not 100% sure about the parsing of 3d. All of my reference sources indicate that “Guinea” (coin or country) abbreviates to “Gn”. But then I’m left with a surplus “N”.
    Overall, I found #210 to be a bit tougher than usual: somewhere around quartz (7) on the hardness scale.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Thank you Greg. I agree with your parsing of 1d. I read “appreciated by” as “associated with”. David indicated that “each” was 2 words. I was working with the 2 and 3 letter words but could not get the 1,3 in the middle. Well done.
      Richard might correct me on this, but I think in my early banking days the Guinea (worth £1.1s) was recorded as G. I have no recollection of Gn. I always knew pounds as £, shillings as s and pence as d (now p in England). So I had no issue with G. It may even appear in newspapers when they record the prices reached at horse sales.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Don’t recall dealing with Guineas in a purely accounting sense Arthur – from 1961/hand-posted Ledgers/push pens – mixing ink (tho Biros soon thereafter). Unfamiliar with the Symbol, would say they were more a market pricing mechanism? – & by the time they reached the Ledger Desk were Pounds (no symbol on my key-board!!!) & Shillings.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          PS>>> I didn’t have a problem with “G” for Currency OR Country once the answer started to emerge ….. & Yes, closer scrutiny of Greg’s Parsing for 1d suits me just fine tho I won’t be in the Grange Market any time soon!!!

    • David Stickley says:

      The guinea = g thing is an interesting one. Obviously it’s dated, but my memory of its use is as used in the clue. My abbreviations list, that goes back a long way, has it, but my searching hasn’t agreed with my usage. It is possible that the abbreviation changed with the increasing use of grand = g (which would be confusing in a monetary sense) and possibly gram = g, but I can’t find any evidence of this (not that there would be). Upshot: I won’t be using it that way again.

      Best

      David