The Stickler Weekly 213 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

5-across



11-across




19-across



23-across

27-across

28-across


3-down

4-down

7-down


14-down

16-down


21-down

24-down

A word or series of words that signify the position of wordplay elements in the answer.

Examples: before, after, leading, in the middle of, under (down only) etc.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is hidden inside the clue in reverse order. There are two indicators: one to signify that a hidden word is present; the other to reverse the letters.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
Punctuation generally should be ignored - always consider how a clue reads without punctuation.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

The answer is a jumbling of letters except for the initial or final letter of the anagram fodder. An anagram indicator and truncation indicator will be present.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

This entry was posted in Stickler Weekly Clue Help, The Stickler and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

54 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 213 Clue Hints

  1. Patrick Lewis says:

    Done, but admittedly with a lot of luck and help from online resources – google of course, thesaurus and quick solver. It is very rarely that the solver doesn’t have the answer in there somewhere for the number of letters. Kind of cheating, I suppose, but still a great challenge, including working back to fit the clue. My dear old dad used to do the Times (UK) every day up to the very end at 92, lucid as ever – without any of these modern aids. Nevertheless, thanks for another very satisfying meal, David.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      From one who has learned the lesson well Patrick, you will enjoy the Journey even more if you take the Scenic Route i.e. the long way round.

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        Yes Richard, you are right of course and that is the primary challenge. As a child we could only afford to have roast chicken once a month and as a consequence the enjoyment was so much more. For the moment I am somewhat spoiled by the abundance of puzzles archived here – 140 to go! After that, assuming life continues, I shall no doubt savour the weekly that much more – a poor excuse, I know, for not doing so now!

        • Richard Sternes says:

          All Good Patrick.
          I tend to forget at times that not everyone has been around since the Get-Go & are therefore, always hanging out for their Weekly Fix – the next “Knew Thing”. Much wealth to be mined here, many years of enjoyment ahead for you.
          I have learned & discovered much over the years.

  2. Richard Sternes says:

    Determined to get 10d – 4-3-6 without resort to Clue Hints.
    (It’s all about weekly serving of Alphabet Soups, Arthur)
    Assuming it’s an anagram of “dapple parents”
    Perplexed elsewhere too, but it’s early days………..

  3. Steve Clarke says:

    Another difficult grid this week David, with a new word for me at 19a needing a dictionary. Richard is right, 10d is a beauty, took me a while to get but was a great moment when it hit me. Also liked 1a, 17a and 27a. Thank you 😃

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    Having fallen for the trick before I’m assuming that 21d “Claude 11”
    refers to 11a which is also proving quite a challenge.

  5. Richard Sternes says:

    Still not entirely convinced about 2d & 21d but can’t be anything else.
    Others of note 23a & 27a – 1d & 4d for the sheer Mental Gymnastics required.
    10d mentioned previously – just brilliant
    & 14d four letter word took forever, so simple in the end.

  6. Cathy says:

    Top right corner still eluding me. I think I have 5a but any hints for 10a and 7d and 8d would be very welcome. And sadly Richard this is AFTER using all available resources.

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Hi Cathy. 10a – the seconds are very short then it could be a laugh… er, 7d – they seem to be having trouble over this in the Murray-Darling region these days! 8d – can’t wait to get going? Hope that’s not too much….. or maybe not enough.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Yes like those Cathy & Steve. Another view…
        10a – think of the Footie after (s)econds to go.
        7d – Steve if Right-On, bit of an unusual take, but it works.
        8d – for sure, can’t wait to get going.
        5a – could be a person using a very old-fashioned way of copying an image???

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          Richard, your 7d suggestion has me baffled. I must be missing something.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            No Patrick, meant IS Right On – as in correct, exactly, OK, agree etc.
            No lame cryptic attempt there!!!
            I also needed to take a broader view of the answer.
            All Good in the end.
            Got a chuckle with your Knew/New take……..

  7. Cathy says:

    Thanks Patrick and Richard for your help. Got them now. Phew!

    Cheers Cathy

  8. Arthur Maynard says:

    I downloaded this after 11pm (Qld time) on Tuesday. Two days later I have just struck the first blow. Looks like a long journey ahead. I will just have to forget about Computers Probus and U3A and get stuck into it.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Was wondering where you were Arthur.

      • Wendy Simpson says:

        Me too, but am also lagging this week, feel a bit brain dead atm.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          I am up to the north east corner with 5a, 6d and 8d to go.
          Several guesses from the crosses which worked out, and a few light bulb moments.

          I will need to check the on line version because I am not comfortable with some answers.

  9. Greg C says:

    Despite the misleading punctuation in 1d, I still can’t seem to justify my “s”.

  10. Arthur Maynard says:

    I have problems with 12a. Only 4 letters but the mind is blank. ? H ? N.

    I am not happy with a couple of others, but need to get this to check the on-line version

    Any suggestions will be welcome.

    Thanks

  11. Patrick says:

    Hi Arthur, I didn’t feel too good about this one either, definition-wise…. but you need a synonym of matter, then chop the end off. Alternatively you could think of light in terms of fat-free!

    • Patrick says:

      Well, low-fat anyway.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        12a My matter ends with a G. I still do not get the congratulations so there may be another error.

        4d The hint reveals that the definition is at the end. My 4 words match that definition.
        My word play is an anagram (two words) container. But I have CENT over and OF missing. The two letter word must be OF because the cross ends in F. I originally thought that OF came from the second word in the clue, but it has been used in Collection of Galleries.
        17a T?N. My 3 letters meet the definition but I cannot find a word of 4 or more letters work the word play.
        None of my resources help now, so I may just have to wait until Wednesday to see how David has done it.

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          Yes, the wordplay in 4d I also found very tricky. The clue hint gives the collection of galleries, followed by OF. Then for the remaining letters I can only assume that ‘flexible’ allows taking the final 2 from centRE + THAT as an anagram. It does seem a bit loose though. We shall see.
          17a – the youngster is a ‘man-child’ not grasping ……, and there it is!
          I’m never too sure how much to give away here but I hope this helps.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          Arthur – all is not Lost.!!!
          12a – Patrick has this, seems you have the “matter” just lop the end & it is “light” – maybe gauzy?
          4d – my take – everyone seems to have the “galleries” put them into flexible (maybe mushy) finished with “centre”
          17a – it’s all in “botany” less youngster.

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            17a Soooo simple!
            4d I parsed that satisfactorily when on my first go, but lost the plot. Patrick put me back on track.
            Now I am happy with all my parsing except 21d where I seem to have surplus letters and cannot yet find an indicator that helps.

            I could not get the congrats, and could not find the problem. North west corner 1a

            So simple. On reflection I cannot see how I accepted my original parsing.

            Since that 1a nearly beat me, I have to give it a guernsey.

  12. Arthur Maynard says:

    I will venture a few comments on clues which I particularly enjoyed.
    6d Short and challenging. Sent me to the dictionary which is a good thing.
    7d Good construction. I was totally off beam initially, but found my way.
    10a Liked the definition and the sleight of hand in the word play
    19a Unusual word (dictionary material) but available from the clue.
    1d Careful reading required to get the aha moment
    10d &lits are challenging.
    24d Took me some time to find the first letter of the word in the word play.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Yes liked all those too Arthur.
      I’m still pondering 2d
      can’t be anything else, sort of an &Lit, but doesn’t seem quite right somehow.
      & 21d – I’m going with a link to 11a but seem to be short of a “u”
      & what of discarded letters?

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        2d – you could say capable of = up to
        21d – hidden clue in clause + 11a
        4d – still not happy, like centre = heart but where does T come from?

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          10d – the beauty to me is not so much &lit as the perfect anagram of dapple parents!

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            Gary beat me to this one. But Patrick’s reference to heart reminded me of my original parsing I agree about the four letter word. An iron bar is not flexible.
            10 d The & lit provides the definition and word play in a special way. Read it once and you get the definition. Read it again and you get the word play.

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          4d – or maybe flexible = oft? Beats me!

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        2d If something is in your mind, you could say it is ?? ???
        I often say ‘Up there for thinking, down there for dancing”.

  13. Greg C says:

    I think it’s a 4 letter word meaning pliable, containing the gallery, all followed by the center

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Ah, there it is! I was misled by gallerieS but they’re all one Tate. Mushy, pliable, flexible – it figures.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        “Like”

        • Richard Sternes says:

          OH ! & I am happy with 2d Patrick. Thanks.
          Still pondering 21d. Only Three more sleeps…..

          • Patrick Lewis says:

            21d – to me it is a simple hidden clue, end of’ ‘clause’ and beginning of 11a (‘supposing’ you have that one!).
            Great puzzle this week! A lot of luck in getting congrats but just as much fun working it back.

  14. Arthur Maynard says:

    21d David You little beauty! I chose to ignore what you said, and assumed I understood what you meant. A simple container but I needed to find the bits contained. I already had them but could not see the woods (words) for the trees.
    For those who have not got the parsing, read the clue word for word, and think about why each word, and one in particular has been used.

    Definitely Gold for this one.

  15. Greg Mansell says:

    Late distracted finish this week – it’s all Pyeongchang’s fault.
    13a: At one point I had –C- –F, so I had a couple of options for a phrase meaning “quickly leave”. However, I correctly assumed that one of them was unlikely to appear in a Stickler.
    1d: I always enjoy a sporting reference
    6d: A new definition of the answer for me
    10d: A ripper
    21d: For once I immediately remembered what to do with the “11”
    24d: I particularly liked “character after a”

  16. Richard Sternes says:

    21d – Even tho I was altert to the “11” trick, I was NEVER, EVER going to get this,
    spread over two separated Clues.

  17. Sue martin says:

    I wonder if someone can explain the wordplay involved in 17a. The fact that it is a subtraction clue leaves me none the wiser. We achieved the solution before it was published, but our beloved detective was simply the obvious answer given the letters already in place.

  18. Sue Martin says:

    Sorry, David, I had been popping around, working on some of your archived material between new crosswords, and had certainly got confused. I still don’t ‘get’ it from what has been posted. Could you possibly guide me through it without the veiled references?

    • David Stickley says:

      The explanation given to the HP clue is: Anagram of OUR HELICOPTER, yet the clue doesn’t contain OUR HELICOPTER, it contains OUR FOUR and ends with a question mark. I use a question mark very intentionally, and here it means something extra is going on, specifically that FOUR isn’t FOUR, but the answer at FOUR in the crossword, which is HELICOPTER. For this to work, FOUR must be unique (that is it can’t be across and down, otherwise it would need qualification) and the “?” must be present to inform solvers of extra trickery. Otherwise it’s a straightforward anagram.

      #213 contains a similar device (using another clue’s answer) in 21-down, “…Clause 11?”

      Best

      Stickler

  19. Sue Martin says:

    Thanks so much. I should always remember that good crossword compilers are evil b’s. 🙂