The Stickler Weekly 214 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

10-across


12-across


18-across


27-across

28-across

29-across


3-down


7-down

9-down

14-down


21-down



The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The entire answer is found by reversing part of the clue, or a synonym for part of the clue. A suitable reversal indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

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32 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 214 Clue Hints

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    A very enjoyable set of challenges.
    Dictionary was required to check the meanings, or accuracy of 12a, 13a, and 21d.
    Great word play at 2d.
    I really liked Richard’s favourite alphabet soups. Having a few crosses often helps to visualise the words, which can then be parsed.
    I finished this fairly early in my week’s program, so tried to compare t with last week.
    This week I was relaxed and my brain was fully engaged. Last week there was a bit going on which made it difficult to focus on the puzzle.
    The degree of difficulty is really very similar. The puzzles provide valid definitions and word play which is open to analysis, and new experiences.
    A very enthusiastic well done David.

  2. Patrick Lewis says:

    What Arthur said, plus checking dictionary for 22d and 25d for meaning and accuracy after challenging myself NOT to resort to wordsolver or thesaurus this week, Richard, however long it might take!
    Not a mushy puzzle by any means and no reference to Valentine’s Day – unless the number 2 14 is taken cryptically (American style)! Nevertheless, filled with love of the art as usual I’m sure. Thanks David.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      At least 14 is written in the language of love, and there is a touch of American in 27a. Stretching things a bit

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        Um, yes. The Americanism I was thinking of is the custom of always putting the month before the day when writing a date. Thus Stickler number 214 just happened to be published on February 14 (2/14) which also just happened to be Valentines Day – as alluded to by David in the intro to this crossword. Maybe I’m getting too cryptical (!) trying to make something out of all that!

  3. Richard Sternes says:

    Would rather not be here right now Guys, but I am missing ALL
    of which you speak (above). More later.
    Feb 14 was also C-Day 52 years ago. Have been sharing some musings about ALL that
    on my FB page. Was a Teller on The Day, large Sydney Suburban branch,
    examiners etc back in harness on the Line.
    Did “Big Red W” have Slickers Arthur? My Cash Count was $10.00 over End Of Day.
    A Slicker on C-Day would have been the Ultimate Prize.
    On Americanisation of dates Patrick, much prefer it & almost exclusively use it.
    Month first helps to more quickly pin-point “When is It”.
    Glad you enjoyed the Scenic Route, meant as a Guide only.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Yes there was great joy when you had a slicker. We also had the scales to balance the ledgers, and our new juniors were sent to another bank to borrow theirs if ours could not be found.
      In the lead up to C Day I was in the coin room, so once a day abut 7 of us piled into the cash car (armoured) with the jittery supervisor carrying the (one and only) gun and collected millions of dollars in new notes for distribution to the branches. For the changeover I was seconded to Surfers (sufferers) Paradise and spent the day in the back room calculating converting and checking interest products. We then worked into the night posting the days ledgers, balancing, the ledgers, converting, and rebalancing. A slicker was highly valued at 10 pm. The bonus was meeting my wife and we married within a year.

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        Nice to hear your reminiscences, Arthur and Richard. I wonder what a ‘slicker’ is – google tells me it’s a raincoat or an untrustworthy person, neither of which seem to fit.
        American dating in numerical form can cause some problem for the unwary however. I was an English tutor for a young doctor in Bangkok some years ago who was applying for the aptitude test in the US that would enable her to practice there. She had applied for the test for 1/6 (1st June) that year but was rejected on the grounds that 6th January had already come and gone! She had to begin the whole process over again but was eventually successful.
        Back to the crossword – I like the alphabet soups too, eg. 9d. With a few letters it usually seems easier to guess the answer rather than grapple with an enormous anagram.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          A slicker is when you balance the ledger (or other sum) on the first attempt. In my day we hand posted the ledgers of customers accounts by writing every deposit and cheque in the massive loose leaf book, and calculating the new balance. The vouchers were called over daily – the manager called the account name and the transaction detail, and the checker found and confirmed the transactions. The totals of the transactions were posted to the general ledger daily, with the balance being calculated daily. At the end of the week (every Wednesday in the Wales), you listed the balances of every account, and the total had to agree with the balance in the general ledger. If it balanced at first go, you had a slicker. If it did not balance, you had to recalculate transactions in every account until you found the error. This was a dreadful state of affairs, as the reports were sent off to the State Manager every Wednesday and you could not go home until the accounts balanced.

          Machine posting of ledgers changed that system. But slickers occurred several times daily as you listed the opening balance of every account which had a transaction, then all the cheques and debits, then all the credits and deposits. Finally you listed the balances of all accounts which had a transaction. Opening balance plus deposits less debits gave the closing balance which had to agree with the listing of closing balances. People became quite adept at finding simple errors.
          Oh what joyous memories.
          And this exchange ties in with David’s insights for this week.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          It’s a colloquialism much loved by Bankers/Tellers Patrick.
          Bit harder to explain than I thought. Take Tellers OPENING cash balance – then after ALL transactions processed during the day are taken into account, if that new “book” balance equates with the ACTUAL cash counted end-of -day – that’s a Slicker.
          Can you improve on that Arthur?
          OH & remember those (not me fortunately) who were sent to the Post Office to get a Verbal Agreement Form?
          Harmless fun & huge enjoyment for P.O. counter staff. of course

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Major Time & Memory lapses here Arthur.
            Had totally overlooked the Accounting processes.
            Still locked in that Teller’s Box on C-Day!!!
            Need to shut this down. But – Hand-posted ledgers, what a trial. Push pens (biros round 1962 I think) & Combank had Savings to themselves until about same time – a whole other (Ledger) story.

          • Patrick Lewis says:

            Thanks for the explanation. Sounds like a good word for anything that goes right at the first attempt. In fact, if I may be so bold – and cryptic -this week’s Stickler, timelessly adjusted, was something of a slicker!
            12a, 13a and 25d I would never have got without google/dictionary though.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Correct Patrick. Excellent definition.

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    Much Dictionary Delving required this week – 23a – 21d –
    & yes Patrick had to resort – to Solver of Last Resort – for 13a.
    As usual much enjoyment with anything vaguely Alphabet Soup
    1a, 29a, 3d (especially) & 9d to mention a few.
    Loved 17d, perfection, had me wondering if it was Bastille Day as well.

  5. Wendy Simpson says:

    Finally got the congrats.
    Loved 16a, took forever to get the low-tech bit, 26a describes me pretty well this week!

  6. Greg Mansell says:

    12a, 13a, 23a: New words for me
    16a, 29a, 2d: Nice definitions
    20a: I vaguely remembered this word, but needed the help of Mrs Mansell and the Chambers brothers for confirmation
    14d: So Frenchy, so chic (not). Loved it.
    25d: Beautiful, elegant construction.
    Bring on Wednesday!

  7. Steve Clarke says:

    Finished the grid yesterday but no congratulations so have spent today trying to find where I’ve gone wrong. 9d and 22d are the only two answers that I can’t quite fit to the clue ( the last word of 9d and the first two letters of 22d) but they’re the only words that fit so I’ll have to wait for Wednesday to see why I was so 26a. Agree with the other solvers regarding the clues this week they were very well contrived (including the low tech missile) thanks David

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      9d is a charade. Word 1 is an abbreviation. (change the pronunciation). Then you have founder taking on (containing) a new role. It is an unusual connotation for founder – but think in terms of a dynasty. It all means very quickly.

      22d Think in terms of the bible, and the method used by Jesus to teach morality, and behead the word.

      26a my first answer ended in dead rather than lacking. 14d showed me I needed an s, and should reexamine the clue. Then I 27a the answer.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        You’ve really 27a everything here Arthur.

      • Steve Clarke says:

        Thanks Arthur, I’m an idiot, I had 9d ok (thank you for explaining the “founder”) but had a word starting with “vi” for 22d thinking the last 4 letters were one of Aesop’s tales with the f missing. Once I got the right word for 22d I fixed up 23a (I had “income”) and got the red banner, thanks again for your support,
        Steve

  8. Christine Hulley says:

    Late to start and finish this week. A few new words as well.