The Stickler Weekly 218 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

10-across



15-across


20-across

21-across

24-across

25-across

26-across


2-down

3-down

5-down

6-down

7-down

14-down

15-down



A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

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33 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 218 Clue Hints

  1. Richard Sternes says:

    Inauspicious start – At Best. Barely One-Third there after Day One.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Likewise. I have the east side done, but much of the west eludes. Could not really concentrate yesterday. Some beautiful clues this week. well crafted, with a couple of special tricks.

  2. Wendy Simpson says:

    I’m still working on the west side as well. Hoping for a light bulb moment!

  3. Richard Sternes says:

    Getting There but speed is Glacial.
    Some thoughts on 1a & 3d may help me fall over the line
    & not real confident of my 5d either.
    Agree Arthur beautifully crafted clues (yet again) – e.g. 16a & 20a

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      (If I’m right) 1a – Albert is in the bus and we could do a swap to stop us falling off! 3d is great alphabet soup – seems a shame to spoil it, but if you feel like you’re really stuck and can’t get out you might have this! 5d – I really needed the clue hint for this one, plus the old ‘catches up’ inside – quite a stomachful really.
      But where have I gone wrong…..?

      • Richard Sternes says:

        YUP.!!! Was close with 1a Patrick – see it now.
        Agree 3d maybe best ever Alphabet Soup, had ingredients just couldn’t get them to gel.
        Onto loose ends – several WHY SO’S at the moment.

  4. Patrick Lewis says:

    Likewise slow this week. Quite a struggle but some great aahs, 1a and 1d, 11a, 16a for instance. I thought I had it, but apparently not. Trying to work out why……

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Well I don’t know – it’s got me beat. Have checked spelling and every answer parses out quite beautifully. Pity, cos I reckon its the best crossword ever! Will have to wait to see what silly thing I’ve missed – assuming the software and everything is shipshape on the other side!

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        Ok, got it. I was a bit iffy about 6a and that was the problem – a sly clue! Altogether a most satisfying solve. A great one, David. Many thanks!

  5. Arthur Maynard says:

    I’m joining the fray also. I have a word for each clue and the parsing seems to fit. Sometimes I have put all the answers in the on line version and failed to get the congrats. I have done that using different browsers, and still no luck.
    Some very good cluing this week – tested the grey matter.
    16d was a pleasant surprise when I got the word. I almost felt like having one.
    20a A new word. Google confirmed my answer, Put together piece by piece.
    27a Very droll David.
    2d I had the word, but it took some time to get the parsing which appears to be spot on. Without the congrats, I cannot be certain of anything.
    3d A really great clue. A challenge which fell into place once I confirmed my ideas by checking David’s hint.
    5d Like Patrick I like the reference to catches up.
    8d Lots of little quirks in this one, but a superb clue.
    16d I spent a lot of time thinking about bankers and tellers, but that was not even in the same town let alone street.
    19d Google confirms the staple bit, but I wonder whether this is where my error lies.

  6. Arthur Maynard says:

    Thanks Patrick. You pointed me to the clue where I made my error. I have t he congrats now. You probably heard my cry of “OF COURSE”. This is my pick for the gold medal this week.

  7. Steve Clarke says:

    It seems Patrick has got a couple of us over the line this week by rethinking 6a, a very clever clue. Other favorites (which have already been mentioned in the blog ) are 1a, 10a, 15a, 27a, 1d, 6d and the gold goes to, of course 5d.
    Thank you David 😃

  8. Truey says:

    16a and 16dn have me and my crossword buddy stumped hints please?

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Hi Truey,
      16a – deceptive wind, pre-dinner perhaps?
      16d – think double definition, old money.

      • Truey says:

        bit of a Derrrrrr moment when you work out that 17dn was wrong and after correction the 2 16’s fall into place hahaha

  9. Richard Sternes says:

    Like everyones Picks of the Week, all on my list.
    Would add 12a – the 50% trick was one of the best.
    Judging from above, becoming convinced my 6a is wrong.
    Unsure of 9a too, answer fits but seems there is surplus clueing.
    Another thoroughly enjoyable romp thru Cryptic Land.

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Took a while to decipher 9a too. Sorry to spoil the fun but it looks like (correct me if I’m wrong) an &lit/hidden clue again. Ooh! That pesky little 6a!

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        Correction- 9a is not &lit – the second part is not literal, except in a cryptic sense.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          Commented above about Patrick about my enjoyment of your alternative clueing for 1a, 3d & 5d.

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            Richard
            I think you have 9a, but are uncertain. It is new money in avoirdupois or whatever the metric equivalent is. I just noticed how close 9a and 11a are.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Just checking back in Arthur – Yes to 9a.
            Hidden clue, just seems to be a couple of unnecessary words in there. Must me just me!!!
            Then the “cutting” similarities is 11a, had missed that.

          • David Stickley says:

            I’ll bite, Richard. Which words are unnecessary in 9-across?

            David

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Hidden clues are often like that for me David.
            Seems this one just would not let me go.
            All Good now – really.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            One More Sleep
            to next GO-Round. ………YAY.!!!

    • Andrew Gibson says:

      Thanks, I have been pondering over how a five letter word can be reduced by 50% but in fact it is a “score” reduced by 50%. Now I only need 20a.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        If you haven’t got it Andrew. Definition is “small dog”.
        I had never heard of it.
        Rearrangement of clueing may assist, it IS late in the week.
        Order is “mush” + “is sick” + “just after” = ON.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          Late in the Week Andrew as in – can be a bit more frank & give a bit more away.

          • Andrew Gibson says:

            Got it! I got stuck in believing that a small dog had to be a young dog. Thanks but I now can’t claim that I solved it unassisted.

  10. Christine Hulley says:

    Got the congrats at last, gave the old grey cells a work out this week!

  11. Greg Mansell says:

    Good fun as always. For me, it was a medium-strength Stickler.
    6a, 10a, 1d, 4d, 5d: Nice definitions.
    12a: Last in. I loved “score reduced by 50%”.
    21a: My favourite, of course.
    27a: Good fun.
    15d: I do like a good porter.