The Stickler Weekly 221 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

4-across

11-across

13-across

20-across

22-across



28-across

29-across


3-down


17-down

18-down



A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

Punctuation generally should be ignored - always consider how a clue reads without punctuation.
A word or phrase that defines the answer. All cryptic clues usually have a minimum of one definition which will be located at the beginning or end of the clue.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
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26 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 221 Clue Hints

  1. Greg Mansell says:

    Another great Stickler this week. Has anyone else finished it yet?

  2. Michael Kaiser says:

    Stuck on 1,16 across and 24,25 down.

  3. Christine Hulley says:

    Finished reasonably early. Some good clues as usual.

  4. Christine Hulley says:

    Particularly liked 15d and 18d.

  5. Arthur Maynard says:

    A great puzzle with a variety of simple and complex clues. 15d is a pearler. Easy to get confused.
    24d was my education this week. I had not heard of this, and concentrated on something with tendrils. Wakey Wakey.
    1d made me laugh out loud when the penny dropped.
    28a David I like your sense of humour in this clue.
    Others of note for me were 4a, 13a and 26a

  6. Richard Sternes says:

    Barely One Third there – must be just me.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      & no Clue Hints for half of what’s missing.
      Ultra-Tough Gig this one. Definitely not On-Song this week.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Toughest in a while, maybe of all time. Needed serious dedication.
        Great Challenge, Thank You David.
        Now comfortable with 24d, having read your comment below.
        Endorse everyones Picks of the Week, some really good ones.
        Won’t revisit those & I seem to have had many of the same difficulties.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          Loved 5d & 10d of course, for my usual Soupy reasons.
          Also thought 20a worthy of note.
          Being hopeless handy-man I really struggled with this.

  7. Michael Kaiser says:

    Can’t get 26a and 24/25d

  8. Michael Kaiser says:

    How do I read the clue for 24D? Is there an obscure African climbing plant or animal?
    It has to be pxtxo and I can’t find anything that works.
    Ind 26a I can get lxxsxxg but don’t see anything that the clue is asking for that my answer satisfies. Someone please help. thanks.

    • David Stickley says:

      24-down isn’t a well-known animal, but I thought I had written a simple clue to make up for that – obviously not! Take a general term for a piece of upper-body clothing and flip it, the other two letters are “in the clear”.
      26-across something isn’t right with the letters you have – the “s” (which isn’t right) appears in a position that doesn’t match the crossing answers.

      Hope that helps.

      David

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        I had difficulty with the concept of the clothing. Then I realised they were often advertised as that. Accepting that, I found I did not know the word, but thought it would be a plant. Google confirmed what it was which conformed exactly to the description in the clue. There are plenty of Australian animals I am not familiar with, so I was not surprised to learn about a new one in Africa. It made a change from lions and hippos.

  9. Steve Clarke says:

    I too have difficulty with 19a, 26a and 24d, I have words to fit in the grid but can’t reconcile them with the clues, very frustrating 😳

    • David Stickley says:

      Steve, see my reply to Michael above – hopefully that will get you further.

      David

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        In 26a the nail only accounts for 3 letters. I tried to anagram it, using “hammered into” as an anagram indicator but that did not work. It is a container indicator as David’s hints told me later.

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          another tip here for 26a. You have the last letter and the definition. The next two three letters back should be reasonably guessable, and that should lead to the 4th last, and the solution.

          • Steve Clarke says:

            Finally finished after 2 long days. With your help I got 26a and 24d (new word). Still couldn’t work out 19a until I put in a word meaning “check” and got the congrats. Didn’t understand the first part of the clue until I read it again and realised what David had done. You got me , well done, and thanks Arthur for the extra help. 😀

          • Richard Sternes says:

            I frequently have difficulties with Hidden Clues (19a) & seemingly unrelated Clue Hints. Once I find the “Hide” try not to let the rest bother me too much.

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            Richard the indicator here is the first two words “series of”. That suggests you should look for a series of letters in the following words to arrive at the solution. I hope I am not preaching to the converted but from your comment, I felt that you accepted the answer but could not see why.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Thank You Arthur & All correct. “Series of” is an indicator unfamiliar to me. …..It now is!!!
            Such matters are not called Life Long Learning without good reason.
            In my previous comment – meant unrelated “Clues” (full stop) delete “Hints”.

  10. Patrick Lewis says:

    Quite surprised to get congrats after quite a struggle – thought for a while I’d never get this one and still felt a bit doubtful re. the smaller words. NW corner the last to fall – and I did resort to some online help and the hints of course. Still a bit dubious about 13a as could only find references to an historical predecessor for this definition. 18d was a great clue, imo, but again left wondering about the definition as my references indicate a type of person rather than a feeling, however from previous experience here, they are most likely legit. 26a was great too, and only after guessing from the definition saw that nail was not what it appeared to be! 1d was a great self-kicker.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      13a continue to be used by chinese traders who can do maths nearly as quickly as a computer. In my experience they have many moving parts, so I wonder about classing them in accordance with the definition. However Wikipaedia directed me to site where there is one depicted in stone as in the wall of a tomb, and several from really early times where the moving parts do not move, but are replaced by knobs or lumps, and this would make them tablets. I well remember that the Bank of New South Wales called its first computer after this calculator. If only it had been as reliable when it came to fortnightly wages, and staff accounts. Must give the Bank the benefit of the doubt, because they say Garbage In Garbage Out – GIGO was the rule.
      18d the answer shows up as a synonym for the definition in google. I was thinking of biplanes and monoplanes and could not reconcile the two planes with the definition. Both a bit of a stretch perhaps, but accurate (even though needing additional research)

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        Thanks Arthur. 13a – that’s basically what I came up with too, although I also note a couple of brand names – one a medication for diabetes and the other a digital device for presentations. I remember seeing them used by shopkeepers in Turkey and Iran many many years ago – I bet they just use their phones now!
        18d – yes, I’ve just located the synonym – working back from the answer, but there’s too much to check the other way round. Like you, I have only associated this with aircraft – and a eucalyptus eating flying Australian insect.
        My step-father was a bank manager in an English provincial town – I remember as a child waiting in his office after school with nothing to do but read banking magazines until it was time for us to drive home…… and opening my first bank account there at the age of 16 when the idea of charging for most services, especially those involving your own money, was simply unheard of!

  11. Greg Mansell says:

    There were a few tough clues which made it fairly slow going for me this week.
    4a: Particularly straightforward, once parsed. Hindsight is a wonderful thing.
    13a: A new definition for me.
    27a: I’m surprised that nobody else has mentioned this one. Good fun.
    28a, 2d, 10d, 15d: Clever definitions.
    18d: A new definition for me. I liked “source of deal”.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I like your picks. I sometimes feel overwhelmed by the choice of clues for comment. David can be relied on for a variety, which appeal to individual tastes.

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