The Stickler Weekly 226 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



5-across

8-across


14-across



20-across


24-across

26-across

2-down

3-down


6-down

8-down

9-down

12-down


16-down

21-down

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
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27 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 226 Clue Hints

  1. Lyn Socha says:

    I thought I’d finished in record time. Unfortunately no congrats. Oh well, back to drawing board.

  2. Christine Hulley says:

    Got the congrats, favourites were 8d and 9d.

  3. Michael Kaiser says:

    Need more of a hint for 14 across.

  4. Steve Clarke says:

    Not quite as difficult this week David but still some curly ones. Favourites are 8a, 14a, 17a, 24a, 6d, 8d, and 9d.
    Last in was 26a, just couldn’t get it – very annoying. Thank you David.

  5. Arthur Maynard says:

    Most trouble with 14a. After much serious thought I was able to parse the answer.
    I like the unusual indicator in 13a.
    A relatively easy start, came to a stop in the lower half of the puzzle with the occasional answer eluding me.
    Once again the cluing leaves little doubt about your answer

    Thanks David.

  6. Patrick Lewis says:

    Like Arthur, was doing well till left with a couple at the bottom. Finally succombed to checking the hint for 24a and realised I had 19d wrong – stretching ‘unlawful firing’ into an anagram of roast = p-astor! Too clever by half when the right answer should have been as clear as day. Anyway, after that all fell into place.
    9d yielded the most ahh-ful pleasure for me this week.

  7. Lyn Socha says:

    I finally have the congrats. 6d and 23d tripped me up. Thanks for another great challenge David.

  8. Richard Sternes says:

    Endorse everone’s Picks of Week.
    Would add 22a – perfect & very cute “&Lit” & 15d the answer just “sings”
    Assuming with 13a that “Offspring” is the Indicator – Arthur?
    & still can’t unscramble the egg at 14a. Got the alcohol but the rest???
    18a is a “subtraction” but can’t see the deletion of Three letters from “hangout”
    More speedy run thru this week, but no less challenging.
    Thanks You David. Dare I hope that I am continuing to improve?

  9. Cathy says:

    Have it all excepet for 23d any assistance would be welcome. Also got 14a but along with Richard, I can’t quite see why. Re 18a perhaps thinking spectre might help.

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Hi Cathy,
      23d – it’s typically a specialized term, hiding there – as I discovered from google.
      14a – ‘as’ above, to Richard.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        Cathy
        23d is familiar to anybody in the printing industry, and some of us who don’t want to stick to calabri.
        I assume you have letters 2 and 4. As Patrick says. The others are hiding.

  10. Richard Sternes says:

    Many Thanks everyone – 14a & 18a – OF COURSE
    Nothing at all to do with eggs (scrambled)
    – all about peeling another (different type of ‘layer’) – from the Onion.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Richard
      I expect you jumped on 2d with your banking background. That posting was a doddle, and often lucrative

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Yes indeed Arthur – Way back in my days in bush branches
        (Goondiwindi & St.George – early 1960’s) they always seemed so worldly wise, mature & “glamorous” – women especially AND men. Breath of fresh air.

  11. Greg Mansell says:

    Knocked it off in a night, unaided – a rare occurrence chez Gregoire. That didn’t make it any less enjoyable.
    14a: The definition, when I finally worked it out, was a beauty.
    20a: The first time I’ve ever seen a bridge reference in a Stickler. Luckily, it referred to pretty much the only thing I know about bridge.
    22a: Notable for a couple of reasons. Firstly, for the surface reading, It’s the first time I’ve ever seen “ungainly” used as an adverb. My trusty Chambers confirmed that this was valid, albeit rare, usage. Secondly, it’s an absolute ripper of a clue – probably the most concise &lit I’ve ever seen.
    25a: An interesting note for the surface reading: Of the 4 dictionaries I looked up, only the Macquarie and Oxford have “summit” as a verb. Chambers and Collins have it only as a noun.
    15d: Luckily for me, I had a vague memory of seeing this word before. Otherwise, I would have really struggled with this one.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Terrific analysis & comments Greg, as always.
      Completely agree & yes definitely, 22a is Hall of Fame material.

  12. Cathy says:

    Thank you Patrick and Richard re 23a. Got it!

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Yes Cathy.
      When they hide in plain sight like that I often wonder how I missed it
      – but I do, frequently