The Stickler Weekly 227 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across



19-across


24-across

25-across




1-down

2-down


4-down

5-down



11-down

17-down

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The entire answer is found by reversing part of the clue, or a synonym for part of the clue. A suitable reversal indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
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39 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 227 Clue Hints

  1. Greg Mansell says:

    A reminder to the regulars: Please pay your subscriptions to help keep The Stickler Weekly going.
    I make a payment for each batch of 25. I’ve just paid for #226-250.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Yes – most important Greg. David has not mentioned this for quite a while.
      Behoves us devotees to drive this or we will lose it.
      I do something similar, six-monthly – birthday + six months later.
      I am still not convinced or confident that $2.00 per week is sufficient.

      • Patrick Lewis says:

        Thanks for some measure of guidance on this, Richard. It seems reasonable viz-a-viz the cost of a weekly newspaper or book of puzzles but as you say, hardly a sustaining income for David. Nevertheless, I’ll see what I can do to ease my conscience re. this treasure trove.

  2. Arthur Maynard says:

    A nice workout for the mind this week. I continue to be impressed with the variety of words and clues David provides for us each week.
    21a Having some experience with auditing and finances, I looked in the wrong direction.
    2d 3d and 4 d Love the humour and the misdirection.
    What to do now. Luckily I have my 2 cryptic groups this afternoon.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Still working on 21a Arthur & totally agree – 2d, 3d & 4d are absolute gems.

  3. Lloyd Seaton says:

    Feeling lonely as I struggle with 23d & 29a.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      23d is almost a “sounds like” Clue Lloyd. Was a total & unexpected surprise.
      STILL clueless on 29a

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        23d. The definition is fishes. Now the term is used regarfding internet savages. pieces are not slices.

        29a David’s hint tells us it is a reversal. The hint foroverseas users reminds us the ladies is a toilet.

        21a has nothing to do with finance, although one item relating to finance might be included.

        • Lloyd Seaton says:

          Thanks, Richard & Arthur. Very relieved to solve 29a and finally saw the light with 23d.

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          ‘Internet savages’ – what a great definition!

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Yes Patrick, sad to say, that’s more the common usage these days.

          • Patrick Lewis says:

            Yes indeed, Richard. Apart from the dim-witted giant variety of Harry Potter style and childhood fables, I had to google the reference to fishing.

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            Patrick Obviously you did not have to spend time on a tinnie cruising up and down a lake lake of dam with a fishing line trailing behind in the hope that some fish might suicide and take your bait. Now That’s trolling, complete with sunburn and boredom.

          • Patrick Lewis says:

            That I did not, Arthur. Never had much luck fishing – and always some problem reconciling my (potential) pleasure with another creature’s pain. Still like fish and chips though.

  4. Patrick Lewis says:

    Couple of tricky ones (for me) forestalled the congrats:
    1d drove me nuts – I had ‘cocaos’ until I checked the hint. Well, it fit the crosses but sloppy clue reading and actually they are beans.
    23d – battled for ages trying to get Christ the ‘lord’ backwards into a word for fishes. Silly me. At least we don’t seem to have any here, Lloyd.
    29a – seems to be quite a favourite of David’s as in the overseas help. Wouldn’t have to be ‘ladies’ but acknowledge the non-sexism when ‘people’ is so often used to indicate ‘men’!

    Thanks so very much, David. 70 archived puzzles to go, then onto a diet of only once a week. It seems to reach a point where they never really get any easier – but that’s the point!

    Re. Greg’s post above, I’m singing ‘If I was a rich man…..’ to myself, but as a pensioner with hardly a skerrick to spare each fortnight, I feel somewhat abashed indulging in such a guilty pleasure as this. Nevertheless, I do hope you can cash my heartfelt thanks at the UBGK (Universal Bank of Good Karma). Thanks again……. and again.

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Apologies if that didn’t come over as sincerely as intended! Anyway, thanks to Richard, I have just made a more tangible contribution.

  5. Richard Sternes says:

    Too many Loose Ends.
    1a – Am I not looking at One? Why so?
    18a – What’s with basketball?
    21a – STILL ??? but thinking Yearly?
    Meanwhile – other splendid example of the Setter’s Art (Thank You David)
    12a, 28a & 30a. – 2/3/4d already mentioned, 8d yet another terrific &Lit,
    11d & 14d for the usual Alphabet Soup reasons.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      OK Step back. Thanks Arthur.
      THOSE sorts of accounts for of 21a. (Ever the Banker!!!)

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        1a. Yes you are looking at one. It is a really good description of what you see. The clue is &lit (David is giving us lots of practice).

        18a The answer is an archery contest. The basketball team has v members. I cannot find the reason for the rest of t he word, because on its own the rest means obsolete, or restore.

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          Thanks for the basketball team, Arthur. Now I get it, initiating ‘that is’ for contest.

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            I found the team, and thought I only needed one letter. I missed it’s significance as an initiator. This contest is rather obscure, but apparently is a feature of this sport and is very popular, or so google tells me.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Getting there Arthur.
        18a could be any contest really, but Basketball nailed it.
        Should have known that, used to play (a bit) many years ago –
        but certainly never NBL material.!!!
        Now just need to tidy-up thinking on 1a……….AND
        there it is, even as we speak. Thank You.

  6. Arthur Maynard says:

    According to google the whole word is a basketball as used in the olympic games.

    More new words at 16a and 19a.

    Onya David

  7. Arthur Maynard says:

    18a. Ignore all my comments on this clue, apart from the basketball team. I have spent a lot of time trying to parse the answer to 19a with the clue for 18a. Sorry to anybody who was misled by my wanderings.
    Interestingly the answer to 19a fits the definition in 18a, and my education has been taken one step further.
    As we used to say “Wake up Australia”

    • Greg Mansell says:

      Arthur – that’s a relief. I was thinking “What’s he on about?”…or even “What’s he on?”

  8. Richard Sternes says:

    I often imagine David on the side-lines here –
    Jumping up & down going – Yesss!!! Yesss!!!
    They’re with me – they’ve Got It.

  9. Steve Clarke says:

    I applaud your comment Greg, I give David what I can, when I can and hope it’s enough to let him know how appreciated he is on a Wednesday ( and sometimes in my case right through to Sunday).
    Having a terrible time this week, completed the grid yesterday but no congrats, so have spent the last 24 hrs poring over, and reconciling each clue to no avail. Will be interesting to see where I went wrong. Some great clues this week including, 27a. 28a, 30a, 1d, 3d, 4d, 11d and 23d. Thanks David 😃

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Steve
      Sometimes I put my answers in the on line version, and do not get the congrats. I check the spelling, and recheck the parsing, but nothing changes.
      So I close the internet session, start another browser, and put my answers in the online version. No changes, but I get the congrats.
      I do not know what the glitch is , but I blame all my problems on Windows 10 and Edge.
      This happened this week, but the second try got the guernsey. It is worth a try.

      • Steve Clarke says:

        Thanks for your support Arthur, It wasn’t the fault of the online grid but the person filling out the grid. When I was refilling it per your suggestion I realised that 8d could also end in ‘ing’ instead of ‘ant’. Mea culpa. 😳

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          I can see how that fits, and could easily have made the same mistake. I saw it as a verb because of the wording.

        • Greg Mansell says:

          Steve – I initially thought of the “…ant” word, but I couldn’t find any wordplay to fit it, so I looked further afield before I committed to an answer.
          When you initially put down the “…ant” word, did you have any wordplay which fitted? If not, then that indicates a fundamental difference in our ways of attacking cryptics. These different approaches are probably worthy of one of David’s Insights.

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            Here is my take on this
            If engaging is a verb, the word must be ing. If it is an adjective either ing or ant is appropriate. There is nothing to indicate whether it is a verb or an adjective. Quietly might lead to the “p” then you might interpret engaging as long term hiring. I am not keen on this explanation but at least one dictionary supports engage and long term hire.
            I am not a guru on English, but my thesauri record that each word is a synonym for the other, and they both appear to have similar definitions.
            I used the ing from the outset and the referee (online grid) gave me a guernsey.

        • Greg Mansell says:

          Further to this subject, I always treat each Stickler clue as an exam question where you have to “show your working out”. I never fill in the answer until I’m 100% certain that I’ve nailed the wordplay. For me, that’s where the enjoyment of doing a cryptic comes from. And with The Stickler, I can proceed with the confidence that there is very precise wordplay to be found.
          I’d be interested to know who else approaches The Stickler this way. And who’s happy to fill in an answer, even if they haven’t parsed the wordplay yet?

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Pretty much my approach too Greg. Early stages I pencil in cross letters to assist with further developments & if answers become patently obvious but don’t fit clueing, then the real digging begins.

  10. Arthur Maynard says:

    Oops! apart from bad spelling and lack of proofreading. In a blog somewhere above, I have almost given the answer to a clue. My apologies.

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Lake lake of dam it, you could be right! However, the longer this blog gets, though you wouldn’t need a tinnie, it’d be quite an effort to do ‘it’ through it!

  11. Greg Mansell says:

    Not too difficult this week…but comments like that always come back to bite me the following week.
    1a, 29a: Good fun
    A couple of phrases which I particularly enjoyed (when I worked out what they meant):
    3d: “Two mischievous characters”
    22d: “writing on the wall”
    …which brings us to the week’s highlight, 8d: Another beautifully concise &lit.

  12. Andrew Gibson says:

    All done in 3 hours. They seem to be getting better and better. Thanks for your good work David, it really keeps the grey matter active.