The Stickler Weekly 228 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across



11-across

12-across


16-across



24-across

28-across

29-across

1-down

2-down

3-down


7-down

9-down

19-down



A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The entire answer is found by reversing part of the clue, or a synonym for part of the clue. A suitable reversal indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

A word or phrase that defines the answer. All cryptic clues usually have a minimum of one definition which will be located at the beginning or end of the clue.
A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
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26 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 228 Clue Hints

  1. Christine Hulley says:

    Got the congrats, 7d is a new word for me.

  2. Patrick Lewis says:

    Well I don’t know – every Wednesday I say I’ll take my time even if its days and yet these days it gets done, miraculously it seems, in just a few hours. Must be all the solvers on the same mental airwaves, I reckon! Managed with only google’s help today, especially for 3d and 7d after trying my best to decipher the wordplay to come up with unlikely and heretofore unknown words.
    24a, 9d and 14d were delightful surprises which only surfaced as suggested by the crosses but then parsed neatly.
    Thanks again, David (trusting donation was received ok – no word as yet).

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Email received. Thanks David.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Somewhat discouraged here Patrick & Christine
      I am missing ALL these AND more with exception of 9d,
      hence my far roo early visit here.
      Oh Well! (sighs) – I’ll just keep slogging away……………

  3. Steve Clarke says:

    Lots of difficult clues this week David, including 16a (still don’t know where the stove and the stone is in the answer, but it must be right I’ve been congratulated).
    7d is a new word for me also.
    My faves this week are 1a, 5a, 15a, 24a, 26a, 3d, 9d, 14d, and 19d. Thank you and well done!

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Messsage to Self (again/still) – read all Posts before Commenting.
      You are also Way ahead of the Game this week Steve.
      I’m impressed with this New Band – “The Cryptic All-Stars”

      • Richard Sternes says:

        ***Correction***
        meant “The Stickler All-Stars”……..

      • Steve Clarke says:

        Thanks Richard, sadly I don’t consider myself an ‘all star’, just a retired sparky with a liking of the English language and a huge regard for David’s ability to twist, mislead and deceive us with it. I’m happy if I can fill in the grid correctly in 24 hours but that’s a rarity. I then become a 3 day hacker poring over the clues for mistakes. I do enjoy this community of Stickler Bloggers though, they are a great help. 🤩

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          Seems like sheer luck or serendipity to me, Richard. This week the tricky ones mostly sprang from staring at the crosses however unlikely they seemed until parsing.
          3d – helps to separate drug and treatment (as in hint) but still a very obscure word to me at least, not being a great drinker these days.
          7d – also unknown but male is upright in heavy weight a la hint.
          24a – confess I didn’t get the wordplay until seeing the hint. I took it as a kind of &lit with anagram!
          9d – a complete guess from first word crosses. Not a bullish investor!
          14d – loved this one. Bow is a great way to say what comes first!
          Hope this helps a bit but maybe you’re done and dusted by now.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Yes Patrick, eventually limped over the line with much Clue Hints assist. Endorse everyones Picks of The Week. Seems simpler these days to go “All of The Above” rather than make selections. Still not entirely convinced with 3d. Not sure of the alcohol reference & don’t know if we are talking about a common household spirit or an evil street drug. Still Pondering….

    • Lloyd Seaton says:

      I too, was nonplussed by the stove in 16a until I consulted the Overseas Help page.

      • Steve Clarke says:

        Thanks Lloyd, makes sense now, I hadn’t heard of that brand before. Should’ve consulted the os clues 😢

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Steve my take on the “stove” was a wood-fuelled one, once (maybe still) often found in country kitchens & the “stone” was a saintly abbreviation. As always I stand to be corrected.

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    In addition to All of The Above, did think 12a, 24a, 26a & 21d worthy of special note.
    More sublime examples of the Setters Art – Than You once more David.

  5. Arthur Maynard says:

    Much difficulty with this weeks offering. What a contrast to last week’s. Once solved, wondered what the problem was. I agree with all the choices above.
    New words and learnings with 3d, (a great charade). I could not see how the word fitted the definition. Many searches of google revealed that it is a type of wine bottle. I also found a site for bar on the net with the note “be yourself, everybody else is taken”. Thought that worth sharing.
    7d Again many searches finally located referenees to Atlas, and pedestals.
    That’s my education for the week.
    Even with the hint in 29a I had to phone a friend – then kick myself.
    16a was elusive until I had all the crosses and the overseas hint. Interesting parsing.
    Most of the western side fell easily into place. But as in life, the middle east caused much angst.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Thank You for the wine bottle Arthur. It had escaped me, but now have vague recollections. Could not get past the Biblical connections. Nothing to do with common household spirit – at all. My Life is Complete.
      Enjoyed your comments & everyone elses – as always.
      Only four more sleeps & we-all can do it all again.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        THAT started a train of thought & jogged the memory bank.
        It’s all about wine bottle sizes & multiples of standard 750ml. Jeroboam came next to mind, Magnum is in the mix & there are many others, often with Biblical names.
        Never can tell where The Stickler may lead………..

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          This could lead to a pleasant night on the turps as we sample each size. That could also help with the four sleeps.

  6. Greg Mansell says:

    Slow going for me this week – along with many others, it seems.
    5a, 10a, 17d: Clever definitions
    15a: Beautifully put together anagram and subtraction
    3d: Another clever definition – not too difficult for a wine buff (some would say wino) such as myself
    4d: One for Richard
    7d: A new word for me – and a nicely put together &lit
    22d: I liked “…editor repeatedly”

  7. Wendy Simpson says:

    Don’t know how you all find time to do it during the week! Are you all retired?
    Just started, so I’ll see what transpires.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Richard and I are retired, and I think Patrick is too. Steve tells us he is also among the unemployed. Retired from work, scouts, Lions etc that is. Not from life. Just as well, as I could not fit any more into my schedule.
      But one of the most enjoyable things each week is seeing the congratulations on my computer, so that gets a certain amount of priority. My wife looks on in amazement.

    • Greg Mansell says:

      I’m still working full-time – but, with no offspring still at home, the Stickler is a top-priority after-hours activity. My wife looks on in bemusement.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Think of it this way Wendy, you get the prolonged enjoyment & intellectual stimulation.