The Stickler Weekly 229 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



11-across


17-across

20-across

27-across


29-across


1-down

3-down





18-down

21-down



A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is a jumbling of letters except for the initial or final letter of the anagram fodder. An anagram indicator and truncation indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The entire answer is found by reversing part of the clue, or a synonym for part of the clue. A suitable reversal indicator will be present.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
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31 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 229 Clue Hints

  1. Wendy Simpson says:

    Haven’t got far yet, but 13d takes my fancy.

  2. Steve Clarke says:

    Was going well until 27a and 26d, I’ve got no idea – any help would be great 😳

  3. Christine Hulley says:

    27a roll is neither food nor movement related. You may have one of these at work.

  4. Christine Hulley says:

    26d think of pieces of computer equipment that ‘direct’ data, then lop off the first and last letters.

  5. Christine Hulley says:

    Oops, wrong clue for 26d, think of a word for speech in the English language then drop the last letter. Another word for masters, think golf.

    • Steve Clarke says:

      Thanks Christine, got them now, 27a is not an often used word and I kept trying to fit in a paint roller until you gave me 26d then it was easy. Ta

  6. Patrick Lewis says:

    So quiet? Well, I give it a 4a, but hey, 29a there, no need to 27a about it! Only one 15d post so far (from Steve above) but sparing a thought for the solver who 20a.

    15d took a long time to untangle and believe it or not, 8d and 26d were the stickiest for me, but so simple really. Took a while to reconcile the definition of 16d – very clever. Favourite was 17a – so cute!

    Anyway, it’s 2 times 28a without the second, that is, from me!

  7. Arthur Maynard says:

    I was lost on 26d and 27a. The golf suggestion (26d) gave me the start to 27a and that fell into place.

    Because I had to think outside the square, I thought these clues were clever.
    Also like 9d, 4a,12a, 18d.

    I cannot parse 22d, so will think on that overnight.

    Top marks this week to 17a. Lots of practice with this type of clue.re clever.
    Also like 9d, 4a,12a, 18d (well constructed),.

    I cannot parse 22d, so will think on that overnight.

    Top marks this week to 17a. Lots of practice with this type of clue.

  8. Christine Hulley says:

    Not I but *in*

  9. Richard Sternes says:

    Well folks, that’s all very well.
    But as well as being stuck in SW corner, have no idea why I would be gossiping at 7d.
    …..SO 20a-ing.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      7d. There are some very nasty places on a golf course. If you invert one of them it will be Eureka time.
      26a continues the golfing theme, although it also applies to other sports. Much in the news right now. The definition is word 1.

      • Richard Sternes says:

        Yes Arthur 26a – too easy. Down to Two.
        Still lost on 7d (will absorb your hint above)
        & also 16d. BUT still resisting Solver of Last Resort…..
        Have all the crosses for both, can’t be too far away says he
        – with Hope Springing Eternal

        • Patrick Lewis says:

          Some confusion re. 7d(9)/8d(4).
          7d – see another word for interview. Maybe not cricket, but could be!
          16d – definition is simple but the digital screen isn’t about computers or numbers – unless one is just beginning to count!

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          7d There are very few places where you see sand on a golf course – except the greens in outback clubs where they apply sump oil to sand because of the lack of water.

          16d you have two letters so the third must be a given. Think laterally about what the digital screen could be in 4 letters.

          • Patrick Lewis says:

            Are we talking about 7d or 8d – or do I have a different grid!?

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            Yes I am talking about 8d, not 7d. An entirely different sport. I must be getting old and cross eyed.

          • Patrick Lewis says:

            No worries. Thanks.

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            Two weeks in a row I have been totally out of my tree about clues. 7d/8d and 15d/16d. No excuse last week, but this week I had scribbled so badly that I had partially blocked out the numbers in the grid. As they say on TV – “Should have gone to SpecSavers”

        • Richard Sternes says:

          It was 15d (9) I was missing apologies for sending everyone off on a goose chase.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            Sorry to say, first time in a very l-o-n-g time, would not have ‘got’ 7d & 15d without Solver of Last Resort.

  10. Steve Clarke says:

    Thanks people for all the clue hints in the SW corner. This week liked 4a, 20a, 28a, 29a, 1d, 13d, and 15d. Well done David 👍🏻

  11. Andrew Gibson says:

    I am having big problems with 15D. All others completed.

  12. Greg Mansell says:

    So many really good clues this week.
    4a: Nice definition
    17a & 19a: An unbeatable one-two punch. 17a is one of the best clues I’ve ever seen.
    28a: Nice definition and elegant wordplay
    7d: Nice definition. The second part of the wordplay was only vaguely familiar to me.
    16d: “Digital screen” is brilliant…
    18d: …as is “touching play for children”

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