The Stickler Weekly 237 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

6-across


11-across

12-across

13-across

16-across


23-across

26-across

28-across

29-across


2-down


4-down


8-down

9-down


21-down

The answer is hidden among the words of the clue. No spare words should be present. A suitable hidden indicator will point to the buried text.

Examples: part of, associated with, types of.

A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

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21 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 237 Clue Hints

  1. Steve Ball says:

    I managed this in one sitting, though I cheated to get 5-dn. I didn’t know this particular definition of the word, but it’s the only word that can be made with the letters and, given the four crossing letters, I should easily have got it, but my brain wouldn’t oblige. 🙁

    Loved 6-across, 15-across, 24-across and 26-across.

  2. Christine Hulley says:

    Finished but not getting the congrats so a mistake somewhere. Any pointers?

  3. Christine Hulley says:

    The word I have for 1 down means to curtail or cut down as well as being a swelling of a ligament. Cannot see any obvious misspellings. Frustrating.

  4. I had the same problem as Christine and then got the solve per Steve’s hint about a county in Ireland. However, I can’t find any reference for the correct i dn to also apply to a muscular problem when the original i dn entry that Christine and I had does, in fact, apply to both definitions. Think about the side of a street for our original entry.

    • Christine Hulley says:

      My answer sounds like part of a street. If that’s right, I really don’t know where the error is!

      • Christine Hulley says:

        OK, I have now found the muscle reference to the correct answer. It looks like two words fit the answer.

  5. Patrick Lewis says:

    Me too for 1d. Thanks Steve for curtailing what might have been an indefinitely long battle to get the congrats!
    I feel the clues in this week’s puzzle were particularly devious, not the least being 1d, whether intentionally so or not. Most of the tricky ones jumped out from the crosses, and however unlikely, were surprisingly confirmed by googling – followed by quite an extended effort to decode the wordplay. All the more satisfying for that, I suppose. These included 1a, 26a, 3d, 4d, 7d, 8d, 9d and 19d.
    15a and 24a yielded the biggest smiles when solved. 6a was nifty too.

  6. Arthur Maynard says:

    Thanks to the comments I think I am right with 1d now. My word checks out on google.
    I am totally lost on 28a. The hint does not ring any bells. It appears to be a deletion of 3 letters. Letters 1 and 3 seem to be set because of the crosses. Just another 4 letter word.
    Oh well back to the drawing board.
    Parrticularly impressed by the longest solutions 3d and 9d. Also like 23a and 24a, and some others previously mentioned. Too many calls on to David’s hints this week.

  7. Richard Sternes says:

    Testing Times & Gaps aplenty even after Clue Hints.
    6a – how to be rid of second “L”?
    23a – no idea
    24a – where do 4th, 5th & 6th letters come from?
    28a – no idea
    1d – Irish County/edge of footpath – both work?
    4d – no idea
    14d – ditto
    & I had been going SO well.

    • David Stickley says:

      It’s a weekly crossword and you are one day in. Chip away and don’t fret.

      The Stickler

      • Richard Sternes says:

        All Good, David. Use this as one of my “Indicators”
        & don’t like to feel as though I’m slipping.

    • Steve Ball says:

      6-ac: I got the answer to 4-dn by figuring out this clue. Think about it.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Not the guru today but
      1d I am happy with Irish reference, but the other reference eludes me. My limited excursions into googled indicate that the alternate word is not a muscle problem but more of a stopper. Limited research here, as I have satisfied myself, so who else matters?
      23a The letter is not a piece of paper.
      24a You are dealing with two presidents. Take the clued word by word.
      4d is a simple charade. David gives you a really good tip to get started. Again do not read too many words together.
      14d I cannot improve on David’s hint except that I would normally use the two syllables to be separate words in the other order.
      I was doubtful about my 6a but Steve’s comment cleared up the reference to 4. but I still need 28a to try for the congrats. I plan to let it percolate and check back here from time to time.

  8. Patrick Lewis says:

    Hi, Arthur and Richard,
    Hesitate to diminish your fun, possibly, but…….
    28a – this is one of 2 possible spellings and you may be looking in the wrong direction for the single deletion.
    6a – ah, you need 4.
    23a – what does a letter claim (regularly)?
    24a – so clever, this one – all about presidents….
    1d – only one gets the congrats – ligament isn’t muscle, after all.
    4d – interpretation of secret requires some lateral thinking and is somewhat devious, imo, although following the usual pattern, not necessarily criminal!
    14d – I’d like to give a helping hand but really this one’s really quite straightforward.

    Another great Stickler!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Patrick, you got me over the hurdle, with a single word.
      28a. Now I have a great word for scrabble. It may not count for much in scoring.
      1d apparently is a common complaint, but I (great athlete that I am) have never suffered from or heard of it.
      Stickler can always be relied upon for significant challenges, some of which were beyond me, but phone a friend worked well to get me there.
      My top marks for 1d and 28a because of the challdng they provided. Also rapt with 24a and 28a. Beautifully clued.

  9. Steve Clarke says:

    Some great clues in this weeks event, my favourites are, 11a, 17a, 23a, 26a, 29a, 7d, 8d and 21d. Last in was the north east corner, very deceptive. thanks David ?

  10. Greg Mansell says:

    I agree with everyone – very clever and entertaining this week.
    6a: For once I worked out the significance of the “4” straight away. I’m learning…
    15a: Elegant, deceptive surface reading
    24a: Good fun
    27a: I enjoyed “excessively orderly and fussy”
    5d: Nice definition – which was new to me
    7d: Another nice definition
    8d: I enjoyed “flame thrower”
    1d: Luckily, I wasn’t led astray by the “part of a street” option – mainly because I’d never heard of its usage as a horse ligament problem. I was able to go straight to the “Irish County” option – because I’ve often heard of footballers suffering from a ****ed thigh. At school we called it a “dead leg”. You could administer one by kneeing your victim in the side of the thigh. Good times…

  11. Andrew Gibson says:

    A very clever one this week and finally got there in the end.