The Stickler Weekly 240 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

9-across

12-across

13-across


18-across

22-across


25-across



3-down



6-down


14-down

16-down


18-down


21-down


The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
A type of clue where the WHOLE clue defines the answer, and the WHOLE clue also is the wordplay (a mechanism to derive the answer through various cryptic devices). "&lit" is short for "and literally".

To qualify as an &lit, a clue must have no unused components either in the definition or the wordplay - it must be readable one way as a definition, and another as the wordplay.

A word or phrase that defines the answer. All cryptic clues usually have a minimum of one definition which will be located at the beginning or end of the clue.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

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24 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 240 Clue Hints

  1. Christine Hulley says:

    Is it Wednesday already? Just seen the crossword, I may be a little late with it.

  2. Richard Sternes says:

    No Rush Christine. VERY quite here.
    I’m struggling at 75% done & looks as though rest of the gang may be as well.

  3. Joy Whalley says:

    Thanks Greg. I wondered why I was the only kid on the block.

  4. Richard Sternes says:

    Tidying up loose need after some Clue Hints assistance.
    12a – confused
    19a & 4d – seems Why So?
    8d – clueless
    & almost certain of “style” – in 21d

  5. Joy Whalley says:

    Hi Richatd.
    8d was the last one I solved. I had an answer by following the clues given, didn’t think it was right, but it was. Don’t overthink it.
    Same with 12a. Take it bit by bit. I must admit the answer isn’t a phrase I’ve used.
    4d … a new word for muscles. I could only think of one word to fit the letters I had, so looked up the missing piece and it was a word for muscles.
    Hope this helps without giving too much away.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Many Thanks for the Tips, Joy. Will take them into account.
      Was otherwise engaged yesterday, now back to the drawing board.!!!

  6. Steve Ball says:

    I struggled with elements of this. The definition in 12-ac led me to a different phrase that fits all-but-one of the crossing letters. I’m still struggling with the definition.

    19-ac: My Mac’s dictionary (Oxford Dict. of English) gives the word for the first syllable as an archaic usage, but it’s in the Concise Macquarie without any note about usage. It’s just not very common.

    4-dn: I, too, ended up learning a new word for “muscles”.

    I like the quirks in 11-ac and 7-dn, plus the brilliantly disguised seam in 23-dn.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      12a. I struggled with the definition. because I was looking at 12a in terms of placings in field events. Then I remembered as a child playing cards where this term was used to comment that my score was higher than yours. I do not know whether it is in general usage, or which part of Queensland I was in when it was used. I tried hard to put “fore” as the last word.

  7. Christine Hulley says:

    Got there at last. 27a is my favourite.

  8. Patrick Lewis says:

    Many distractions giving little time for this yesterday. Finished today with many doubts but surprisingly, ok. Puzzled long over 16d – kept thinking of a pay rise – and especially 22a, but finally with commensurate satisfaction.
    Like Joy, 8d and 12a didn’t seem quite right but sticking with the wordplay turned out ok. Re. 12a, these days the ‘bonnet’ is attached to the jacket or coat etc. – unless we’re talking American cars, that is. Not to worry – it’s all ‘12a’!

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Yes Patrick. I was way off on the wrong track with 16d. Could not get past those Card insertion devices which mean we will be a cashless Society within a decade. Needed Clue Hints to sort me out. Thanks for the 12a Tip. All grist for the Mill.

  9. Steve Clarke says:

    I’m happy with all the answers in the grid this week except 8d, I have a word in there but not sure it’s correct, “kept in mind” has me bamboozled.
    Really like 11a, 22a and 7d – great clues, thanks David. 🤔

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Another very late starter this week. Downloaded Wednesday before breakfast, but set aside until cuppa time at brecky this am. Took it to the doctor, and the shops to fill in waiting time. Finally cracked it at tea time.
      Very well crafted clues; nouns masquerading as verbs or other mixed parts of speech; commonly used phrases needing to be seen in a different context; all provided enjoyment and challenge. In the end I resorted to the hints to solve 4 which is somewhat disappointing.
      15a brought a great smile when I finally got it. I needed the crosses and reference tot he plural for the muscles in 4d. Kudos for 10a, 8d, and 22a

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      My take is that “mind” is a verb. “mind what I say”

  10. Arthur Maynard says:

    Before I forget my absolute favourite for this puzzle is 15a. “Taken out” had me right up the garden path, even when I had most of the letters in place.

  11. Greg Mansell says:

    Plenty of highlights this week, with a few very tricky clues.
    1a, 15a, 27a, 3d: Nice definitions
    11a, 24a: Loved the second definitions in each of these
    4d: The muscles were new to me – then again, any muscles would be new to me – but the clue led me straight to the right place in the dictionary
    7d: Loved “tasteless toothpaste”
    20d: My favourite, of course – especially “they get”
    23d: As Steve Ball mentioned – a nicely hidden definition

  12. Greg C says:

    On 12a, I hear that expression regularly in football commentary. “And with that kick the Swans are now two goals 12a”

  13. Richard Sternes says:

    Only one more sleep – YAY!!!
    Reasonably confident of 12a (unusual & not heard before)
    & 19a (often talked about by painters with regard to Aust. Landscape.
    Remain unconvinced of my answers to 4d & 8d (could be any one of Three)

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      8d puts a two letter word for a notice inside a four letter word for mind. Mind is an unusual context. Mind (take notice of) my warnings. (as discussed above), as distinct from a body part.
      The person who directs, is the person who is in control thus the boss or ….

      4d Think of the butcher who sat on the mincing machine and got behind in all his orders. The plural replaces 2 letters with 1. Apparently we have a number of these particular muscles, but there is one which is often spoken about.

      • Greg Mansell says:

        …except that the one we all know about ends in “um” – whereas 4d contains the plural of a muscle which ends in “us”.

  14. Richard Sternes says:

    Thank Guys
    HEADED was one of my Three options, can see It clearly now without the Answer.
    About to discover the Mystery of 4d…………

  15. Arthur Maynard says:

    Just in case you have not sorted it out, The muscles are recti, which is the plural of rectus
    Several dictionaries and wikipaedia have explanations similar to this:
    Rectus: Usually refers to the rectus abdominis, a large muscle in the front of the abdomen that assists in the regular breathing movement and supports the muscles of the spine while lifting and keeping abdominal organs such as the intestines in place. The rectus abdominis plays a key role in “sit-ups.”
    Rectus means straight. The rectus abdominis is a straight abdominal muscle.
    I opted (incorrectly) for rectum without checking google where I found recti/rectus