The Stickler Weekly 253 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across

11-across

12-across


15-across



25-across

27-across

30-across

2-down

3-down




9-down




The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
The answer is a jumbling of letters except for the initial or final letter of the anagram fodder. An anagram indicator and truncation indicator will be present.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

Punctuation generally should be ignored - always consider how a clue reads without punctuation.
A word or series of words that signify the loss of one letter at the start or end of a word or string of letters.

Examples: beheaded, cut short, endless, nearly, largely etc.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
The answer is hidden inside the clue in reverse order. There are two indicators: one to signify that a hidden word is present; the other to reverse the letters.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
This entry was posted in Stickler Weekly Clue Help, The Stickler and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

20 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 253 Clue Hints

  1. Arthur Maynard says:

    I have solutions for everything and they all seem to parse. However I am not getting the congratulations. Occasionally there is a glitch in my entering letters in the online version, so I hope this is the case. I will try again later.
    What a pleasure to work with a Stickler puzzle, with well crafted and reliable clues.
    Lots of good work, and each time I check a clue, I am impressed again.
    18a is a new word for me.
    My choices this week are
    22d and 15a, both nicely deceptive
    2d and
    18a (a short word beautifully clued)

  2. Steve Ball says:

    I eventually consulted a thesaurus to solve 22-dn. I knew how the clue worked, but my brain wouldn’t oblige with the needed word. It’s not that hard; I should have persevered.

    And I’m missing the wordplay for 18-across.

    I was hamstrung for a while by misspelling 16-ac. Might that be your problem, Arthur? I prefer to solve on paper so can’t comment on the online congratulations working or not, but I’d be surprised if they don’t though.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Thanks for the suggestion Steve, but that 16a checked out okay.
      I had the same problem as Joy – 6a. I was not happy with my solution, but was fixated on it. Just another pesky 4 letter word.

  3. Patrick Lewis says:

    After a 2-week fast, this went down in one gulp.
    Re. 18a, Steve, the key is ‘down’ as in one man etc.
    Favourites were 9d, and 15a – puzzled for ages over that one!

  4. Joy Whalley says:

    Glad to have you back David. I saved my Stickler for our flight home today and it was timed beautifully. As always you leave me wanting more! I particularly enjoyed 2d, and 22d. Subtle and clever. Thank you.

  5. Christine Hulley says:

    Um … not getting the congrats either. Where can I have gone wrong?

  6. Richard Sternes says:

    Happy New Year Everyone. …Here we go again ***YAY***
    Having WHY SO Issues with 6a & first two letters of 25a
    Endorse all the above Picks of the Week – also thought
    1a, 21a (loved the sound of Daisy) 7d, 14d & 17d worthy of note.
    Perfect examples of the Setter’s Art we have come to know & love.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      Greetings and good wishes back to you.
      6a. Christine helped me identify my error. The word is one of many options for the definition. “beneficial to” provides the first three letters of the solution. The last letter is an abbreviation.
      25a essentially this s a container. Do not overlook the importance of “a”. the second letter is a commonly used abbreviation.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        I thought 1a was a magnificent start to the first puzzle of the year.
        Also like all your likes. “Daisy” raised a broad grin.

        • Richard Sternes says:

          Of course Arthur.
          6a had me stuck on what frequently precedes a bust.
          & 25a the “a” did it.
          Many Thanks
          Now – only six more sleeps!!!

          • Arthur Maynard says:

            That was my problem also. An ex banker to the core.

          • Richard Sternes says:

            6a – Once a Banker, always a Banker Arthur. Trap we both fell into & very much in the News. …Plus Royal Commission, recent lending practices, etc etc have left me gasping. Obscene & disgraceful amongst others, are words I thought never to see attached to my former employer – CBA.
            As regards 25a – spent much time wrestling with the other side of “before Christ” – to no avail, of course.

  7. Greg Mansell says:

    A not-too-tough introduction to 2019: I knocked it off in a couple of hours – which hardly ever happens. My highlights:
    15a: “usually late”
    21a: “cow”
    2d: My clue of the week – clever definition and wordplay

  8. Steve Clarke says:

    It’s Saturday and I’ve just got the congrats,it’s been a tough week. Last in was 22d, a very clever clue.
    Favourites this week are 11a, 15a, 30a, 2d, 9d and 23d.
    Thanks David 🤔

  9. Andrew Gibson says:

    This one along with the AFR provided a very good start for the year!