The Stickler Weekly 258 Solution

Across Answers and Clues Explanations
1 CATAPULT
Sling a listening device secured by religious group (8) (A + TAP) inside CULT
5 POSTS
Structural supports are removed from damaged seaports (5) Anagram of SEAPORTS minus ARE
9 MANAGER
Feeding unit opened up by a supervisor (7) MANGER outside A
10 WAGONER
Western driver, possibly, lost in combat (7) GONE in WAR
11 LAYING
Putting down any girl out of line right away (6) Anagram of ANY GIRL minus R
12 STEADIER
Pilot, taking notice, connected to one with stabilising influence (8) STEER outside (AD + I)
13 POLICYHOLDERS
People covered slippery cargo area wearing Australian loafers (13) (ICY + HOLD) inside POLERS
16 ENTERTAINMENT
Lodge and tent carrying broadcast of main leisure activity (13) ENTER + (TENT outside anagram of MAIN)
20 EXORCISM
Ogre is playing a part in exam’s release? (8) EXAM with A = (ORC IS)
21 PRATER
One who talks a lot to class involved in public relations (6) RATE in side PR
24 SPECULA
Capsule refitted with polished metal reflectors (7) Anagram of CAPSULE
25 RAILING
A supporting barrier is trouble inside circus enclosure (7) AIL inside RING
26 LIMIT
Check stock of local imitations (5) locaL IMITations
27 CAUGHT ON
Criminal punched by a thug in a frenzy got wise (6,2) CON outside anagram of A THUG
 Down  Answers and Clues Explanations
1 COMPLY
Go along with outlet free of complexity (6) COMPLEXITY minus EXIT
2 TANGY
Bug turned up on side of sticky tart (5) GNAT reversed + STICK(Y)
3 PAGINAL
Computer system, one opening up like a book (7) (LAN + I + GAP) reversed
4 LARD
Part of regular diet is fat (4) reguLAR Diet
5 PIGTAIL
Sort of plait covering one girl’s head? (7) Anagram of PLAIT outside [I + (G)IRL]
6 SENTIMENT
Feeling it, upstanding people should be used in broadcast (9) [(IT reversed) + MEN) inside SENT
7 SURPRISE
Stable outside Paris not getting a start (8) SURE outside (PARIS minus A)
8 SWITCH ON
Charming person embraced by child set off (6,2) WITCH inside SON
13 PETROLEUM
Crude role in silent picture originally given backing (9) ROLE inside [MUTE + (P)ICTURE] reversed
14 CLASS WAR
Troubled rascal, running around, saw heartless conflict caused by social division? (5,3) Anagram of RASCAL outside S(a)W
15 REVERSAL
Odd bits of rust appearing in display switch (8) (R)u(S)t inside REVEAL
17 RECRUIT
Take on fawn – it must be south of river (7) (ECRU + IT) after R
18 EARNING
Scholarship with no upper limit is making money (7) (L)EARNING
19 DRAGON
Large lizard is to continue slowly and tediously (6) DRAG ON
22 TWIST
Pair nearly is on time to dance (5) (TW)O + IS + T
23 ARIA
Distracted au pair not impressed with leading song (4) Anagram of AU PAIR minus UP

 

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10 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 258 Solution

  1. Richard Sternes says:

    I was never going to get – 20a, no matter how much assistance – brilliant.
    EXORCISE – EXORCIST was far as I went

  2. Greg Mansell says:

    Yes – ’twas my clue of the week.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I agree that 20a was a brilliant clue.

      On reflection, 13a gets my gold logie because of entertainment value, and the research I engaged in to become totally satisfied with the answer. I had not heard of polers in the context. I engaged in conversations with horse drawn carriage enthusiasts and learned that a friend (of my age) actually drove bullock wagons in his youth. It generated discussions with several friends, and provided a history (and heritage) lesson for the grandchildren and myself.
      And I found the word and definition in a dictionary on my shelves. What more could you ask for.

      • Lyn says:

        I had polers as the remaining letters and found out about bullock wagons etc but still don’t get how polers = loafers

        • Greg Mansell says:

          Lyn – in the Chambers Dictionary, poler is listed as an Australian word. The second definition is “a shirker”.
          In the Macquarie, the third definition is “a lazy person; loafer”.

          • Lyn says:

            Many thanks, Greg and Arthur,for info – can now move on well satisfied (&. more knowledgeable). Have a huge real dictionary tucked away so perhaps it is time to reinstate it rather than relying on online versions. Again thanks and cheers,
            Lyn

        • Arthur Maynard says:

          Lyn
          I have talked with several people who have worked with bullock teams, or who had family who did so in the years 1900 to 1930. They immediately identified “polers” as loafers.
          Universally they identified the pair of polers as the animals at the rear of the team, closest to the wagon, harnessed to the pole, which contribute little to the pulling of the wagon, but contribute by holding the pole and assisting with the steering. They are perceived to be loafing – hence the epithet (you lazy poler) for a person (in Australia or New Zealand) for a person who is judged as not pulling their weight.
          I cannot access Macquarie on line but Chambers on line does not have a definition for “poler”.
          However, my Australian Oxford Pocket Dictionary (reprinted 1981) records the definition “(Aust.) horse, bullock, &c., harnessed alongside the pole (& leaving most of the pulling to others). (sl.) sponger, idler.”
          The dictionary definition is sound, but I have thoroughly enjoyed discovering the word and its origin, and will dine out on the story for weeks.

          • Lyn says:

            Many thanks, Greg and Arthur,for info – can now move on well satisfied (&. more knowledgeable). Have a huge real dictionary tucked away so perhaps it is time to reinstate it rather than relying on online versions. Again thanks and cheers,
            Lyn

        • Greg Mansell says:

          Lyn – if you have a smartphone, The Chambers Dictionary and Thesaurus apps are well worth the small outlay.

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