The Stickler Weekly 263 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.


1-across



12-across

13-across


18-across

22-across

24-across


27-across

1-down

2-down

3-down


6-down

7-down

14-down

16-down

17-down

19-down


A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The answer is found by removing a letter, letters, or a word (either found directly in the clue or derived) from a word or words (or their synonyms). Subtractions involving synonyms must be done with contiguous letters, that is, a word will subtract directly unless specifically indicated. A subtraction indicator is present to initiate the action.
A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The answer is hidden inside the clue in reverse order. There are two indicators: one to signify that a hidden word is present; the other to reverse the letters.
A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

A question mark has been used to indicate "language abuse", that is, a word or words in a clue are used in a technically incorrect way, but the meaning can be still inferred.

Example: A indeed (?) could mean to insert A inside deed.

The clue has two parts, each one defining the answer without using cryptic devices. Ideally each definition should have no etymological relationship.
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11 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 263 Clue Hints

  1. Lloyd Seaton says:

    Very enjoyable thanks, David. Special mention for 21a & 25a.

  2. Cathy says:

    Thanks David. Another good puzzle including some tricky clever ones. 1a was new one for me. Thankfully I finally found a good listing of the options and it made sense.

  3. Patrick Lewis says:

    Another good morning’s workout to wake up the sluggish brain cells. Thanks David – and thanks to google for 1a!

  4. Arthur Maynard says:

    Another good work out.
    1a The answer was fairly simple, but I had never heard this name for the species. Sure enough Google found it for me.
    4a gave me most trouble and was last in. Hindsight is always good. How could I miss it?
    4d Second last in. Parsing eluded me until I understood the significance of elements of the clue.
    13a well-constructed clue. The crosses helped.
    21a tres amusee.
    6d. Love the outgoing friend.
    7d Elegant – if that is a word which can be applied to a cryptic clue.
    20d Outside the box thinking required.
    I had a great run over breakfast – around 70% complete.
    Great stuff David. Always worth the wait.

  5. Richard Sternes says:

    Yes Arthur, all of those & for your reasons stated – plus special mentions for 25a & 19d.
    Not entirely convinced with 15a, yet another pesky four-letter, but can live with it.
    For once I’m up with the leaders – YAY but I think Joy is absent this week & is not here to see it. Ah Well!!!
    Regarding 1a, conspicuously absent this Summer at least here in Toowoomba.
    Missed them.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      15a You went well this week. How would I say that another way?

      Early success is a double edged sword. Great feeling, but lacking entertainment once it is all over.

      Incidentally I had a funny experience with the website this week. I posted a reply and it was the only one there. Then I shut down. I came checked in later and found there were 3 posts, and mine was missing. So I reposted on this site. Goodness knows where the original post went.

      • Arthur Maynard says:

        Today I found the reason for my lost comment. I was on the first screen of the website when I posted. So it is simply operator error.

  6. Christine Hulley says:

    A good one again, struggled with the congrats but Rhein realised spelling thing correctly is a huge help … 🙄

  7. Christine Hulley says:

    Not Rhein but *then* …

  8. Steve Clarke says:

    Thanks David,
    Only took me two days, but at last I got congratulated.
    Don’t worry, I remember 1a very well – the noise!
    9a – brilliant anagram, 21a – very funny, 4 and 16d -very clever
    Cheers 🤓

  9. Wendy Simpson says:

    Finally had time to sit down and finish it. Had a good laugh at 20d!