The Stickler Weekly 267 Clue Hints

(click on the clue number to see the hint)

Click on underlined text for explanation of terms.

Need more hints for these or other clues? Just leave a reply below.



5-across

9-across

10-across

12-across


24-across

26-across

28-across

29-across

1-down

2-down

3-down


7-down


13-down

16-down

17-down

19-down

21-down



Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) around the OUTSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: holding, keeping, embracing - anything that creates the image of containment.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
The entire answer is the result of removing the first or last letter from part of the clue or its synonym. A truncation indicator will be present.
A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

The structure of the answer involves either letters placed outside other letters, or letters placed inside other letters. Which type of container clue is determined by an appropriate container indicator.
Either a mixture of letters is placed inside or outside other letters, or letters are placed inside or outside a mixture of letters. An anagram indicator and containment indicator will be present.
A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A word or series of words that signify the turning around (across & down clues), or overturning (down clues only) of letters.

Examples: upset, reversed, retired, in withdrawal, over etc.

The answer is found by using the sound of a word or phrase. Sounds-like indicators point the way.
The answer is found by butting together parts defined in the wordplay. There may be some positional indicators that change the order of these parts.
A word or series of words that signify a mixing-up of letters.

Examples: changed, at sea, confused, all over the place - anything that indicates change or jumbling.

A pointer that signifies the placing of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents) on the INSIDE of one or more parts of a clue (or their equivalents).

Examples: held by, kept by, embraced by - anything that creates the image of being contained.

A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

A type of clue that involves the mixing up of letters without the inclusion of a letter or letters. This clue will have an anagram indicator to signify jumbling and a subtraction indicator to signify the removal of a letter or letters.

A removed letter may be as seen in the clue, an abbreviation for a word in the clue, or the result of another cryptic device like taking the initial letter from a word. Removed letters may be a whole word as seen in a clue, the synonym of a word in the clue (if that synonym is contiguous within the anagram fodder), or the result of another cryptic device like taking the middle two letters from a word.

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28 Responses to The Stickler Weekly 267 Clue Hints

  1. Lloyd Seaton says:

    It’s been a weird Wednesday. My Wednesday morning was dominated by a very enjoyable engagement with the Weekly Stickler, as is customary. However, my Wednesday afternoon has been anything but normal. In recent times my “normal” Wednesday afternoon has involved interaction with the Stickler Weekly community, a group of enthusiasts who possibly have little in common but their weekly tussle with the mystical workings of David Stickley’s mind. I have come to place a high value on this social interaction with similarly afflicted souls. They may not know it but they are all on the “Stickler Spectrum” and I feel a great sense of camaraderie with them.
    So, what was special today? Today, the Stickler Weekly community fell silent, fearful that they might discourage some of their fellows. Such consideration is to be commended, but I feel that those who are vulnerable to discouragement are probably not going to engage with the comments unless they are actually seeking help towards the solution. Accordingly, I’m not in favour of inhibiting the posting of comments.
    I am only a relative newcomer to this community but I thought I should put in my two cents. Many thanks to you all for sharing the Stickler Spectrum with me and, of course, thanks a million to David.
    Lloyd

    • David Stickley says:

      Thanks for these comments Lloyd. I must admit I was slightly surprised at the silence, as I had stated that there would be no restrictions on posting for the time being. The silence was self-imposed but maybe a taste of what might happen. Interestingly, apart from a few early comments each week, it usually takes a day for comments to get going, but without those early comments, it was like no-one was out there. I’ll admit that I checked the website at lunchtime just to make sure the website and latest crossword were available!
      So I think the jury’s out for the moment.

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      I favoured the idea of deferring comment to avoid discouraging those who struggle to complete the crossword. I regularly visit the blog to see if there is a place where I can provide support or ideas, and I value the interaction. Frankly I miss the exchanges.
      Today I would like to have some help and this is the place where it should be available.
      For once I have read the front page of the site where I found
      “Please include comments or discussion about this crossword below.”
      “Request help in the Clue Hints blog entry so all can see.”
      Perhaps if we were to follow those suggestions and confine our comments to the entry page, and the SOS and responses to Clue Hints, the blog will meet the need to provide help and allow the exchange of comments which I feel may assist David in setting the degree of difficulty for the puzzles.
      Now for my SOS
      15a I am out of ideas. I think the definition is at the beginning and that “created” is an anagram indicator. My solution has an extra “e” over the word which I can find in the Merriam Webster dictionary.
      7d I have a word which fits the crosses and appears to be an adjective for a word which is defined in Merriam Webster. It is a word which I have not previously encountered but could be used to describe “Formica”.
      Help will be appreciated.

      • Lloyd Seaton says:

        15a – See Richard below.
        7d – You seem to be absolutely on the right track, Arthur. In the field of aerodynamics, this adjective is used to describe the non-turbulent flow of air across an aerofoil.

  2. Richard Sternes says:

    “What they said” – This is what I love about our Community – well considered, thoughtful responses. Arthur has nailed it with the Quotes above. Without over-simplifying a complex issue, if there is going to be self censorship, let it be to consider if interactions here COULD discourage all those learning the ropes & modify accordingly to foster that Spirit of Encouragement. We are, all of us, learning as we go. There is always something new. Typical “form” for me Day 2 & I’m into Clue Hints & looking to feed back here, but having had a better start than usual. More later……..
    15a – Arthur Yes, follow that thinking, but not sure where your extra “e” is coming from – “bright colour” = stop
    7d – like you, on my clueless List.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Above all add – COURTEOUS responses
      writes Still Struggling!!!

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      7d I have a two part answer which seems to fit the clue and the clue hint. I am a bit iffy about it, because I have not encountered it before. Lloyd appears to support my ideas. I will have to wait until I have the other solved to try for the tick of approval.
      Meanwhile back to 15a. I can get a seven letter word which (new to me) relates to templates and design. that leaves me with an “e” to place somewhere. I am wondering whether my 13d is wrong. My second letter (and the last for 15a) is c.
      There is still a week to go, and some time I will probably pick up the paper and a light bulb will explode.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Speaking of learning as we go, could someone please unburden me about 12a.
      Can’t be any doubts about the answer, but WHY???

  3. Patrick Lewis says:

    Had a problem with 13d too until correcting an unparsed ‘fire’ at 20a.
    Arthur – 15a, after the definition there are 3 successive neatly clued parts, and Richard has indicated the final one.

    Re. the ongoing discussion, I agree with Lloyd that as a ‘help’ forum, everyone is free to seek assistance at whatever level, and there are always others happy to share what they can, although the self-congratulatory expressions of “Eureka!” may not be what those still struggling early on may be happy to see, and thus could perhaps be done without.

    The Stickler seems to be unique, not only in offering clue hints and the option of friendly peer-assistance, but also in that the main blogging takes place before the solution is revealed – which does tend to limit the scope of discussion however.
    For myself, exhausting the whole Stickler archive at a rate of about a puzzle per day over the last couple of years has left me with an addiction that needs feeding daily, so I have turned to the Guardian, where the solution, in part or whole can, if needs be, be revealed via the check or reveal buttons. Hence there are few comments re. solving on the puzzle page itself. On fifteensquared.com however there is usually to be found, apart from the solution and parsing by one of a team of bloggers, a robust but civil and entertaining discussion by veteran solvers (sometimes the setters themselves), regulars and newbies alike.

    Being far from confident, I have yet to venture to post there myself, but return to the Stickler every Wednesday and the congenial little group of us who post here. However, in spite of the camaraderie and encouragement, I have found that when on occasion I have mentioned some niggle or quibble it has landed me in somewhat hot water, so in view of this, and the fact that this is, after all, David’s own website, I find myself tending towards a more passive attitude and a consequent lack of oomph!

    In this regard, there was a particularly vigorous discussion recently at http://www.fifteensquared.net/2019/04/11/guardian-cryptic-27792-by-tramp/ on a) the stretch between a word and feasible synonym, and b) the “it’s in Chambers” unopposable discussion-stopper. While it is comforting to know that I am not alone in having dared to touch upon both of these points here previously, I am not overly concerned about them and am happy that they are all a part of the extensive and ever-evolving cryptic crossword world, however I must admit to being somewhat discouraged from making any such comments here in future, which I find a tad limiting on a site like this.

    Having said that, there should be no need to take anything unnecessarily personally – after all, cryptic puzzles derive their pleasure from the tension between the setter’s and the solver’s wits, and unfortunately, in the linked discussion above, the setter does eventually get ‘pissed off’ and threatens to metaphorically take his toys and go home!
    Well worth a read however if you have a few minutes to spare.

    PS. Sorry for the long post. I already scratched a couple of attempts to comment, so I’ll let this one fly…

  4. Arthur Maynard says:

    Thanks for the support and encouragement.
    15a. After removing the c, I finally found the correct definition, and the word fell into place which seems to confirm my other queries.
    Patrick’s comments led me to believe that “fire” is incorrect. So I changed that to meet the word play. Not happy Sue! Until I checked the dictionary where I learned that the word can meet the definition. As in discharge the duties of a position.
    That finally led to David’s charade.
    I would probably have got there, but would have taken much longer without the help from my Stickler friends.

    • Richard Sternes says:

      Yes Arthur I fell into that 20a Trap too,
      until I thought a little more broadly, as did you.
      Glad to know you got there with 15a.

  5. Christine Hulley says:

    16 down is eluding me. I have the rest (I think).

    • Arthur Maynard says:

      The professional’s charge is contained in the solution. “Around” is the indicator. The answer is something a printer does in the process of printing a page. Initially the container seemed off to me until I thought about how much silver I could fit into my trousers pocket which is a valid use of the word.
      It is hard not to give it away, so I hope that helps.

    • Patrick Lewis says:

      Hi Christine, stuffed – as in a kind of padding on the inner side of a jacket, say – might help…

      • Christine Hulley says:

        OK, I have that clue and I understand it but am not getting the congrats. Something else must be wrong but I am happy with all other answers. Aargh!

        • Christine Hulley says:

          Something odd happened here. It was 14a. I changed the last letter, nothing happened. I changed it back to what I originally had and got the congrats. ??

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